Timeline

1641

The Richard Platt lot.

1670

A house, barn, home lot and orchard.

1724

A map of the plan of New Haven when there were only 157 houses, drawn by Joseph Brown.

1761

Roger Sherman moved to New Haven, and opened a store across from Yale College.

1770

Roger Sherman completed building his house.

1775

Portrait of Roger Sherman, by Ralph Earl.

1779

The British invaded New Haven and ransacked Roger Sherman’s home.

1784

Roger Sherman swapped land with a neighbor, and his store accepted non-currency as payment.

1787

Character sketch of Roger Sherman, by William Pierce.

1789

President George Washington dropped in for tea.

1793

Rebecca Prescott Sherman, mother of men.

1821

New Haven Green and the Grove Street Cemetery, by Ellen Strong Bartlett.

1855

Last residence of Roger Sherman, no. 1050 Chapel Street.

1860

The Rail Splitter speech in New Haven, by Abraham Lincoln. The Wide-Awakes of Connecticut: a most remarkable scene. Gaius Fenn Warner, iron magnate, purchased the Roger Sherman plot, and built a new house, with a double bow front, by architect Henry Austin.

1865

Frederick Douglass attended the inauguration of Abraham Lincoln.

1880

Peter Carll’s Opera House: from construction to the grand opening night.

1882

An account of the Junior Promenade of ’82, by Frederick W. Rogers.

1884

Yale’s first banjo club, by Marshall Bartholomew.

1887

Dedication on East Rock.

1888

Every wheel leaves its print upon the soil, by Frederick Douglass. Republican wine bibers, and the first annual banquet of the club.

1890

With the help of a few extra players and a piano, by Charles Ives.

1892

The League give their first shore dinner.

1894

Charles Ives gets inspired by, “After the Ball.”

1895

The New Haven Symphony Orchestra, by Morris Steinert.

1902

Another big hotel rumor.

1903

The Union League Club opens new building most auspiciously.

1906

Klaw & Erlanger Co.’s stupendous production of Gen. Wallace’s mighty play, “Ben Hur.”

1908

The New Haven Grays offer the military opera, “When Johnny Comes Marching Home.” Williams and Walker star in the side-splitting comedy, “Bandanna Land.” The Ben Greet Players and Russian Symphony Orchestra present, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” with Mendelssohn’s music.

1909

The Board of Aldermen granted permission for the Hyperion theatre to erect a flashy electric sign on its canopy over the sidewalk.

1912

Delegates taken in group of autos to see permanent pavings of the Elm City.

1914

Yale men disturb Gaby.

1915

Annette Kellerman and the spectacle of the female form, by Peter Catapano. Schoolboys posed at the premiere of the film, “Birth of a Nation.”

1919

It takes all kinds of freshmen, by Ralph Mcallister Ingersoll. Looking back to the days when our Connecticut drummers discovered what “pep” means to business, by James A. Howard.

1924

Wild night of the bogus multi-millionaire who hadn’t a cent to pay for it all.

1948

Spaghetti palace jester entertains patrons, by Dick Bothwell.

1954

Theaters at the mid-block, by Elihu Rubin.

1970

Old New Haven society clubhouse to be street people’s center.

1974

Burger birthplace faces bulldozer, by Michael Knight.

1975

Tiny lunch counter outfoxed the wrecker ball by 48 hours.

1976

Another dignified, well-made building, standing empty, by Elizabeth Mills Brown.

1977

Sherman’s Taverne by the green, by Ernest Nejame.

1979

Business whiz stirs renewal, by David Wessel.

1985

Prime commercial space now available.

1987

Who owns the block? by Diane Richards. If Robert Henry’s is not the best restaurant in Connecticut, what is? by Jane and Michael Stern.

1988

Desserts that sin not, by Carla Van Kampen. Jo McKenzie, restaurateur, by David Fink.

1989

Joel Schiavone turned the abandoned Union League into a sumptuous corporate office, by Steven Mufson.

1990

An acre of seats in a garden of dreams, photos by John Lewis.

1993

Union League Café serves up elegant fare, by Rebecca Howland.

1995

I’ll see you in court, by Michelle Chihara.

1998

A magnificent old structure, slated for demolition, by David Ottenstein.

2008

New Haven photographer David Ottenstein documents a disappearing era, by Michael Harvey.

2017

Portrait of a vanishing landscape, by Jonathan Turner.

2019

The creative genius of Jacques Pépin, by Robert Rabine.