Timeline

1641

The Richard Platt lot.

1670

A house, barn, home lot and orchard.

1724

A map of the plan of New Haven when there were only 157 houses, drawn by Joseph Brown.

1761

Roger Sherman moved to New Haven, and opened a store across from Yale College.

1770

Roger Sherman completed building his house.

1775

Portrait of Roger Sherman, by Ralph Earl.

1779

The British invaded New Haven and ransacked Roger Sherman’s home.

1784

Roger Sherman swapped land with a neighbor, and his store accepted non-currency as payment.

1786

A plan of part of Chapel Street, showing the buildings and occupants.

1787

Character sketch of Roger Sherman, by William Pierce.

1789

President George Washington dropped in for tea.

1793

Rebecca Prescott Sherman, mother of men.

1821

New Haven Green and the Grove Street Cemetery, by Ellen Strong Bartlett.

1855

Last residence of Roger Sherman, no. 1050 Chapel Street.

1860

The Rail Splitter speech in New Haven, by Abraham Lincoln. The Wide-Awakes of Connecticut: a most remarkable scene. Gaius Fenn Warner, iron magnate, purchased the Roger Sherman plot, and built a new house, with a double bow front, by architect Henry Austin.

1865

Frederick Douglass attended the inauguration of Abraham Lincoln.

1868

Presentation of the Roger Sherman watch to General William Tecumseh Sherman.

1880

Peter Carll’s Opera House: from construction to the grand opening night.

1882

An account of the Junior Promenade of ’82, by Frederick W. Rogers.

1883

Red Cloud visits a friend: the great Indian chief is the guest of Prof. Marsh in New-Haven. The Carriage Builders’ Convention: inside, a grand banquet, and large tents set up behind Carll’s Opera House. Rode on a handcar: Mary Anderson’s exciting effort to fill an engagement.

1884

Yale’s first banjo club, by Marshall Bartholomew. New Haven’s great park.

1886

Three prominent men descended from Roger Sherman. On a dark and stormy night, the New Haven Yacht Club’s first concert.

1887

New Haven in 1887, by Walter Allen. Dr. Winchell takes legal possession and receives the keys. George B. Bunnell takes over the lease on May 1, and from that time it will be known as the Hyperion. Dedication of the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument, on East Rock. The Republican League purchases the club house on Chapel street. The improvements completed, a vast change in the appearance of the Hyperion.

1888

Every wheel leaves its print upon the soil, by Frederick Douglass. Republican wine bibers, and the first annual banquet of the club.

1889

The only perfectly educated school of horses in the world.

1890

With the help of a few extra players and a piano, by Charles Ives.

1891

Peter R. Carll is back from California.

1892

Truly living whist is played on the stage. The League gave their first shore dinner.

1893

The theater of New England, by George B. Bunnell.

1894

Charles Ives and “After the Ball.” Vanderbilt Hall, gift of Cornelius Vanderbilt in memory of his son.

1895

The New Haven Symphony Orchestra, by Morris Steinert.

1901

Decorations: festoons of bunting, imported lanterns. Yale’s bicentennial celebration: the gown laid aside. Samuel Langhorne Clemens, doctor of letters.

1902

Another big hotel rumor. Interesting historical paper read by Judge Baldwin last night. The corner stone of the addition to the Union League Club building was laid with fitting ceremonies.

1903

The Union League Club opens new building most auspiciously.

1906

Klaw & Erlanger Co.’s stupendous production of Gen. Wallace’s mighty play, “Ben Hur.” Noted men of Connecticut as published in the columns of The Evening Leader of New Haven, by Edward James Hall.

1907

New Hyperion manager, E. D. Eldridge.

1908

The New Haven Grays offer the military opera, “When Johnny Comes Marching Home.” Williams and Walker star in the side-splitting comedy, “Bandanna Land.” The Ben Greet Players and Russian Symphony Orchestra present, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” with Mendelssohn’s music. The Shermans have ruled America, by Dr. B. J. Cigrand.

1909

The Board of Aldermen granted permission for the Hyperion theatre to erect a flashy electric sign on its canopy over the sidewalk.

1910

The Knights of St. Patrick and the Hyperion Cigar: the story of cigar manufacturer John P. Kilfeather versus the New Haven Cigarmakers’ Union No. 39.

1912

Delegates taken in group of autos to see permanent pavings of the Elm City.

1913

Governor Simeon E. Baldwin talks with James B. Morrow on the dominant questions of the day.

1914

Three Yale students were arrested toward the close of a show given by Gaby Deslys at the Hyperion Theatre. Connecticut is coming to be famous for its fruit.

1915

Annette Kellerman and the spectacle of the female form, by Peter Catapano. Schoolboys posed at the premiere of the film, “Birth of a Nation.”

1919

S. Z. Poli presents the Hyperion Players, in “Trilby,” by George Du Maurier. It takes all kinds of freshmen, by Ralph Mcallister Ingersoll. Looking back to the days when our Connecticut drummers discovered what “pep” means to business, by James A. Howard.

1920

On a pair of leather suspenders, by Charles S. Brooks.

1924

Wild night of the bogus multi-millionaire who hadn’t a cent to pay for it all. Hyperion Theater to be rebuilt with beautiful structure.

1927

Recent disturbance at theater recalls serious clashes of the past, during one of which a cannon was trained on college buildings.

1943

A Connecticut Yankee at Yale, by Wilbur L. Cross.

1948

Spaghetti palace jester entertains patrons, by Dick Bothwell.

1949

Charles T. Carll goes to colleges via radio and Shirley Voreck Heysinger paints a portrait of Margaret Carll.

1954

Theaters at the mid-block, by Elihu Rubin.

1963

The Union League available, price $165,000.

1969

Yale history made by freshman girl.

1970

Old clubhouse to be street people’s center.

1971

Women of Yale, by Harriet H. Coffin.

1974

Burger birthplace faces bulldozer, by Michael Knight.

1975

Tiny lunch counter outfoxed the wrecker ball by 48 hours.

1976

Another dignified, well-made building, standing empty, by Elizabeth Mills Brown. They gave us liberty: Roger Sherman, by Ellsworth S. Grant.

1977

Sherman’s Taverne by the green, by Ernest Nejame.

1979

Business whiz stirs renewal, by David Wessel.

1981

Joel Schiavone developing downtown, by Linda Schupack.

1982

Dream for a theater district coming true, by Kristi Vaughn.

1983

Implemented by New Haven’s transportation department, the improvements include wider sidewalks, extensions at their corners and parallel parking on both sides of the street, leaving two lanes of traffic.

1985

Prime commercial space now available.

1987

Who owns the block? by Diane Richards. Joel Schiavone a gadfly without socks or sacred cows, by Bill Ryan. If Robert Henry’s is not the best restaurant in Connecticut, what is? by Jane and Michael Stern.

1988

Desserts that sin not, by Carla Van Kampen. Jo McKenzie, restaurateur, by David Fink.

1989

Joel Schiavone turned the abandoned Union League into a sumptuous corporate office, by Steven Mufson. An actor in the role of his great-great-great-great-grandfather, by Nancy Cacioppo.

1990

An acre of seats in a garden of dreams, photos by John Lewis.

1993

Famous restaurant reborn with a French accent. Union League Café serves up elegant fare, by Rebecca Howland.

1995

I’ll see you in court, by Michelle Chihara.

1997

In the Elm City’s cinematic heyday, New Haven and Hollywood converged on downtown’s bygone movie houses.

1998

A magnificent old structure, slated for demolition, by David Ottenstein.

2002

Mama Jo makes it happen, by Pat Seremet.

2004

One part food, one part France, three parts personality, by Jessica Tom.

2007

‘Tradition’ lives on at Union League, by Rachel Engler.

2008

New Haven photographer David Ottenstein documents a disappearing era, by Michael Harvey. New Haven’s cultural offerings make the city an attractive destination, by Christopher Capozziello.

2012

Downtown alive, by Kenneth R. Gosselin. A Union League union, by Paul Bass. Romantic rendezvous for spring, by Stephanie Lyness.

2015

In conversation: Gregory Crewdson and Richard Deming, by Gideon Broshy.

2017

Portrait of a vanishing landscape, by Jonathan Turner.

2019

The creative genius of Jacques Pépin, by Robert Rabine. Say bonjour to Union League’s new Paris-style patio, by Leeanne Griffin.