Roger Sherman completed building his house.

-Image courtesy of the Internet Archive, The Library of Congress, “The homes of our forefathers. Being a selection of the oldest and most interesting buildings, historical houses, and noted places in Rhode Island and Connecticut,” by Edwin Whitefield, 1882

“The house was completed in 1770, in which year Mr. Sherman moved into it. Within its walls, preceding the Revolution, were held many discussions as to the best manner of meeting the impending difficulties with the mother country; and here, doubtless, were considered the outlines of various articles, the substance of which at length appeared in the United States Constitution, of which Roger Sherman was one of the framers.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, Yale University, “Yale and the City of Elms,” by William Emery Decrow, 1882. (Top) Image courtesy the Internet Archive, “Sherman genealogy… the descendants of Honorable Roger Sherman,” by Thomas Townsend Sherman, 1920

“Res of Roger Sherman New Haven Conn. Picture shows two houses on a diagonal to the picture plane; man walking on sidewalk before second house, tree on far right.” -Image courtesy of the New Haven Museum, Documentary Objects Collection, “Residence of Roger Sherman,” Engraving by unknown artist, circa 1860s-1870s

“The original house stood on the present site of the Union League Club, 1032 Chapel Street. Subsequently Sherman built another house on the same home lot, a little westward, 1050 Chapel Street, now occupied by stores, where he lived and died in 1793.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, “The Fourteenth Annual Congress,” by the Sons of the American Revolution, New Haven, Conn., April 30 and May 1, 1903

-Image courtesy the Internet Archive, “Sherman genealogy… the descendants of Honorable Roger Sherman,” by Thomas Townsend Sherman, 1920

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