Bunnell Takes It.

Leases Carll’s Opera House For A Term of Years — Will Run Bunnell’s Museum The Same As Before Also.

“Manager Bunnell is enthusiastic over his lease of the Carll Opera House, which he perfected yesterday. The lease runs a term of several years. He intends to put in a large amount of new scenery at an early day, and to have the white walls tastefully decorated. The enterprising manager proposes generally to put the house into first-class shape and to make all necessary improvements, as soon as the close of the spring season will allow it. He has not yet decided upon the name for the house and intends to run it on metropolitan ideas. He has Bernhardt already booked for the house, beside the attractions previously contracted for. He intends that nothing but strictly first-class entertainments shall be given. But while running the Carll Opera House he will also continue to conduct Bunnell’s Museum as heretofore, and the higher priced shows will be at Carll’s.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New Haven Daily Morning Journal and Courier, Tuesday, March 22, 1887

Carll’s Opera House.

“G. B. Bunnell, who has been known as the successful manager of dime museums, has leased Carll’s opera house at New Haven, and announces that he shall produce first class plays, opera, etc., and more than maintain its reputation. He wants it distinctly understood that the management has nothing whatever in connection with the museum.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, Hartford Daily Currant, March 22, 1887

Leased By Mr. Bunnell.

“NEW-HAVEN, Conn., March 21.—The Carll Opera House in this city was to-day leased by Dr. A. E. Winchell, for a long term of years, to George B. Bunnell, whose museum in Buffalo was destroyed by the Richmond Hotel fire. The theatre is the biggest in the State. Mr. Bunnell has been conducting a museum here with great success for the past few years.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the New York Times, Times Machine, March 22, 1887

“Can any reader satisfy D. D., of Montreal, as to the authorship of the following: ‘Look not mournfully into the past. It cometh not back again. Wisely improve the Present. It is the thine. Go forth to meet the Future without fear, and with a manly heart.’ It is the motto verse of Longfellow’s ‘Hyperion’ and is quoted anonymously.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, The Detroit Free Press, April 26, 1887

“George B. Bunnell takes control of Carll’s Opera House on May 1, and from that time it will be known as the Hyperion.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, Hartford Daily Courant, Tuesday Morning, April 26, 1887

“Edwin Booth as Hamlet, in the position on the throne where Booth is said to have begun the monologue: ‘To be or not to be, that is the question.'” Image courtesy of John Mathew Smith, flickr, “Engraving of Booth as Hamlet,” 1870

“Mr. Edwin Booth, the noted actor, will be at the Hyperion theater, which is now under Manager G. B. Bunnell’s control, for one night only, May 11, supported by a first-class company. Hamlet will be produced.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New Haven Daily Morning Journal and Courier, Monday, May 2, 1887

-Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New Haven Daily Morning Journal and Courier, Monday, May 2, 1887

At the Hyperion. — A Marked Change in Front — Pleased League Members.

“Manager Bunnell has already commenced to make improvements at Carll’s Opera House. The large billboard in front of the opera house has been torn down and the members of the Republican league can now get a good view of the street from the side windows of their club rooms. The fountain will soon be running.

As Manager Bunnell now assumes the management of Carll’s it becomes necessary to have a permanent office in New York; and Dr. Kahn, who is now on the door at the Grand Opera House, will be delegated to take charge of that office, and William Van Buren, late of the American theater, will take the place here vacated by Dr. Kahn.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New Haven Daily Morning Journal and Courier, Monday, May 2, 1887

-Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New Haven Daily Morning Journal and Courier, Thursday Morning, May 5, 1887

Edwin Booth

“The announcement that Edwin Booth is to appear at the Hyperion Opera House next Wednesday evening is welcome news to the admirers of the great tragedian, and it will be an added pleasure to know that he brings an excellent supporting company and that he will play ‘Richelieu’ in place of Hamlet. This change was advised by his manager, Mr. Oliver H. Butler. The cast for the presentation includes: ‘Richelieu,’ Mr. Booth; ‘King Louis XIII,’ T. L. Coleman; ‘Duke of Orleans,’ H. C. Barton; ‘Count de Baradas,’ Charles Hanford; ‘Adrian de Manprat,’ John Malone; ‘De Beringhen,’ Owen Fawcett; ‘Joseph,’ Carl Ahrendt; ‘Julie de Mortimer,’ Miss Emma Vaders; ‘Marion de Lorme,’ Miss Kate Molony. The other parts of the cast are well assigned. His company also includes Charles Barron, who appears as the ‘Ghost’ in ‘Hamlet,’ and John T. Sullivan, who appears as ‘Laertes’ in the same tragedy.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New Haven Daily Morning Journal and Courier, Thursday, May 5, 1887

The Orphans’ Concert To-Night.

“This evening at the Hyperion (formerly Carll’s Opera House) will take place the annual concert by the children of St. Francis’ orphan asylum. They will be assisted by some eminent local vocal and instrumental talent. Miss Lizzie C. Gaffney will render several of her choicest selections, and her sweet voice will undoubtedly attract many to the entertainment. Mr. E. F. Gavegan and W. C. Williams, Yale ’89, and the American band will also help to render the entertainment attractive to all who attend. There should be a good attendance to cheer the little orphans in their brave endeavor to raise funds for their home, the St. Francis asylum. Following is the programme to be rendered…”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New Haven Daily Morning Journal and Courier, Thursday, May 5, 1887

-Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New Haven Daily Morning Journal and Courier, Thursday, May 5, 1887

Hyperion Theater — A Letter to Mr. Bunnell From the Director of Mr. Booth’s Tour.

“The following is a verbatim copy of a letter just received by Mr. Bunnell from Mr. Chase, director of the Booth tour:

‘KANSAS CITY, April 30, 1886.
My dear Mr. Bunnell:

I cannot describe to you the enthusiasm that is attending the present tour of Edwin Booth throughout the West. He arose at quite a late hour this morning, took a bath, breakfast and started for a walk through the city. Mr. Booth has changed but little during the past few years. His is a figure that commands attention wherever he goes, and many an enquiring glance was fastened upon him during the morning’s stroll.

The present Booth tour, which is under my direction, began at Buffalo September 1st last. It will close at Fall River, Mass., May 14, and will embrace a total of 30,000 miles, every principal city in the North, South, East and West being including in the list of performances. Mr. Booth played four weeks in San Francisco and one week in Los Angeles, this being his first trip through Southern California. Throughout Texas and the other southern States the sum of $3.50 was realized for each ticket sold.

Up to the present time Mr. Booth’s net profits were $300,000, the largest he has received during the same period of time.

The advance sales for the present three days’ engagement amounted to $12,207 and the total sales will aggregate $16,000. This amount is far in excess of any previous sales during the tour. The three days’ sales at Omaha reached $11,000 making Mr. Booth’s gross receipts this week $27,000.'”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New Haven Daily Morning Journal and Courier, Friday, May 6, 1887

-Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New Haven Daily Morning Journal and Courier, Tuesday Morning, May 10, 1887
“Portrait of actor Edwin Booth (1833-1893), in costume as Cardinal Richelieu. Edwin was the brother of presidential assassin John Wilkes Booth.” -Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division Washington D.C., “Edwin Booth as Richelieu, Act 5, Scene 2.” J. Gurney, 1870

“Edwin Booth will appear at the Hyperion to-morrow evening supported by a strong company and will present ‘Richelieu.’ An exchange says: ‘In Mr. Booth’s ‘Richelieu’ the art of acting is exhibited in all its perfection and with a near approach to its grandest possibilities. To pronounce his impersonation a flawless gem is but the obvious duty and plain justice of criticism. Mr. Booth seems at his best this season. His step is light and quick, his action animated and his voice fresh and resonant as in earlier years and he seems to have cast away since last year the burden of a decade. His support was excellent, Mr. John Lane giving a manly ring to the lines of De Manprat, and Emma Vaders acting Julie gracefully and with a delicate reserve.’ Mr. Booth invests the curse scene with a terrible grandeur. His eyes flash, his whole being seems to struggle against his failing strength for the final blow, and his trembling voice grows steady and distinct in its emphasis as he towers above the cowering Baradas.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New Haven Daily Morning Journal and Courier, Tuesday Morning, May 10, 1887.

EDWIN BOOTH. — The Eminent Tragedian to Visit East Rock Park This Afternoon.

“A New York telegram was received at Bunnell’s Museum from Manager Bunnell last evening announcing that Edwin Booth and company, who will appear at the Hyperion to-night, will arrive in this city this afternoon on their own special car and that Mr. Booth and company will pay a visit to East Rock Park during the afternoon. With fair weather to-day no doubt there will be an unusual number of city turn-outs on this favorite and healthful pleasure ground which delights so many visitors from other cities.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New Haven Daily Morning Journal and Courier, Wednesday, May 11, 1887.

-Image courtesy of the Folger Digital Image Collection, Gebbie & Co., Philadelphia, “Edwin Booth as Richelieu,” 1887

Edwin Booth.

“One of the largest and most brilliant audiences of the season greeted the appearance of Edwin Booth in ‘Richelieu’ at the Hyperion Theater last evening. The role, if not the strongest in Mr. Booth’s repertoire, is certainly the most popular one and was selected by the request of many of our theater-goers. At the last appearance of this great actor here he was guilty of gross carelessness in his rendition of two unimportant characters — ‘Don Caesar de Bazan’ and ‘Ruy Blas.’ But whatever may have been his faults on that occasion he more than atoned for them by last evening’s performance. He was called before the curtain at the conclusion of each act and twice he was obliged to respond to a double encore. In the third act, where the crafty statesman succeeds in his quickly devised scheme to ‘eke out the lion’s skin with the fox’s,’ cheers were mingled with the applause. Throughout the remainder of the play Mr. Booth seemed to feel that he had won the enthusiasm of his auditors and they deserved his best efforts. The supporting company was very good, Miss Emma Vaders as ‘Julie de Mortimer’ and Mr. John Malone as ‘Adrian de Mauprat’ deserving special mention. Mr. Owen Fawcett was as funny as usual in the part of ‘Dr. Beringhen’ and Mr. T. L. Coleman played the thankless role of ‘Louis XIII’ without provoking a smile – quite a rare occurrence. The costumes and armors were all that could be desired and the scenery belonging to this theater was so arranged as to serve its purpose. Between the acts the orchestra, which was enlarged for the occasion by the addition of a trombone and a snare drum, discoursed the same old tunes that have become so familiar to all who have attended the Hyperion this season. It is hoped that next season Mr. Booth will make longer and more frequent visits than this season. The box office receipts last evening amounting to $2,275 would seem to justify such a course. Mr. Bunnell is to be congratulated upon the great success of the initial dramatic performance at this theater under his management.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New Haven Daily Morning Journal and Courier, Thursday Morning, May 12, 1887. (top) Image courtesy of the Connecticut Digital Archive, Bridgeport History Center, Bridgeport Public Library P. T. Barnum Research Collection, “Letter: To A. Steward from George B. Bunnell,” March 16, 1881

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