The Celebration of the Two Hundredth Anniversary of the Founding of Yale College, Held at Yale University, in New Haven, Connecticut, October the Twentieth to October the Twenty-Third, A. D. Nineteen Hundred and One

“The Hyperion theatre, Chapel street, New Haven, Conn.”
-Image courtesy of Pinterest, The David Kempner Story, Randy Rosenthal, saved from ebay.com, undated
-Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New Haven Daily Morning Journal and Courier, Thursday, October 17, 1901
-Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New Haven Daily Morning Journal and Courier, Saturday, October 19, 1901
“After passing New York City, everybody on the densely packed trains seemed to be going to New Haven to attend the big celebration; and by Saturday afternoon the town of New Haven seemed literally alive with Yale men. Graduate badges and Yale blue were very much in evidence. The chief streets of the city were beautifully decorated with blue and green, while ‘Yale’ written large met the eye of the visitor at every turn.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, “The Trinity archive [serial],” Volume 15 (1901-1902), by Trinity College (Durham, N.C.), “The Yale Bicentennial Celebration,” by Dr. W. I. Cranford (above) Image courtesy of HathiTrust Digital Collections, “The Yale Banner, Volume LX,” by John B. Hart, Lyman S. Spitzer, Yale University, December 1901
-Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, The Boston Globe, Saturday, October 19, 1901

YALENSIANS GATHER.

Bicentennial Celebration Opened Today

Sunday, October 20, 1901

“The celebration proper began Sunday morning, October 20, at 10.30, with a sermon in the Battell Chapel, by the Rev. Joseph H. Twichell. Before this sermon, the congregation sang Psalm 1xv., the same that was sung at the opening of the first college building erected in New Haven. The sermon was deep, thoughtful, and erudite.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, “The Trinity archive [serial],” Volume 15 (1901-1902), by Trinity College (Durham, N.C.), “The Yale Bicentennial Celebration,” by Dr. W. I. Cranford. (above) Image courtesy of HathiTrust Digital Collections, “The Yale Banner, Volume LX,” by John B. Hart, Lyman S. Spitzer, Yale University, December 1901

Sermon by the Reverend Joseph Hopkins Twichell

“Two centuries of the world’s intellectual onward are to be clearly traced in the record of the life, from its cradle, of this University of ours. Its founders and first teachers were fair exponents of the liberal learning of their day. And whatsoever, from that day to this, through the multifarious labor of study and research in all the earth, has been added to that learning, has in due time been reported here, to be thenceforth, in some shape, embraced in the instruction here given. Which gains, vast, victorious, ever mounting, come therefore into the scope of our present commemoration, and of its thoughts of thankfulness and triumph.

“Moreover, as I have intimated, in the panorama and epitome of intellectual advance which academic history presents, the process of it is with unexampled clearness exhibited. Perusing the chronicle of our own past as it stands in the curricula of studies in successive periods here pursued, one can see room ever making in them for that which is new, and can mark the points of its arrival. It is in the conditions of a community set apart to the intellectual calling that the torch of knowledge is most distinctly seen passing from hand to hand, and the vital relation subsisting between the new and the old made manifest.”
-Excerpt courtesy of ForgottenBooks.com, “THE RECORD OF THE CELEBRATION OF THE TWO HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FOUNDING OF YALE COLLEGE, HELD AT YALE UNIVERSITY, IN NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, OCTOBER THE TWENTIETH TO OCTOBER THE TWENTY-THIRD, A. D. NINETEEN HUNDRED AND ONE,” “Sermon in Battell Chapel, by Rev. Joseph Hopkins Twichell,” Yale University, 1902. (above) Image courtesy of the HathiTrust Digital Collection, The independent v.53, Sept.-Dec. 1901
“At the close of this sermon, the choir and congregation sang, ‘I Love Thy Kingdom, Lord,’ a hymn written by the Rev. Timothy Dwight, D.D., LL.D., president of Yale College from 1794 to 1817, while the benediction at this service was by the Rev. Timothy Dwight, D.D., LL.D., president of Yale University from 1886 to 1899.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, “The Trinity archive [serial],” Volume 15 (1901-1902), by Trinity College (Durham, N.C.), “The Yale Bicentennial Celebration,” by Dr. W. I. Cranford. (above) Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, The Wilmington Daily Republican (Wilmington, Delaware,) Tuesday, October 22, 1901
-Image courtesy of ctpostcards.net, The Yale Herald, “To Have or to Hold,” by Eve Sneider, September 14, 2018

Services in the Churches of the City

“In the three churches on the City Green, adjoining the campus, were held special services with reference to the Yale celebration.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, “The Trinity archive [serial],” Volume 15 (1901-1902), by Trinity College (Durham, N.C.), “The Yale Bicentennial Celebration,” by Dr. W. I. Cranford

Trinity Church

“‘Your old men shall dream dreams; your young men shall see visions.’ Joel II, 28

As the sons of Yale gather to do her homage on her two hundredth anniversary, around her stately structures two tides of life, an outsetting tide and a refluent tide, meet and interflow. The refluent tide brings to her festival a host of men from the stretch of the Republic between the two seas. All of them bear her mark. Many of them have carried her colors to high places of trust and dignity. This Bicentennial Celebration declares in striking spectacle not only the antiquity, but the vitality of Yale University, her range of intellectual motherhood, her power to evoke love and fealty, her wide and penetrative touch on the trained manhood of the nation.

The confluent tides of life around this ancient drill-camp and arsenal of thought, this anniversary week, suggest the theme with which, in the discharge of the honorable duty assigned me, I stand in this place: The Old Faith and the New Knowledge; the confluent Tides in the Thought of To-day.”
-Excerpt courtesy of, “THE RECORD OF THE CELEBRATION OF THE TWO HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FOUNDING OF YALE COLLEGE, HELD AT YALE UNIVERSITY, IN NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, OCTOBER THE TWENTIETH TO OCTOBER THE TWENTY-THIRD, A. D. NINETEEN HUNDRED AND ONE,” “The Old Faith and the New Knowledge, by the Reverend Walton Wesley Battershall, D.D.,” Yale University, 1902. (above) Image courtesy of the HathiTrust Digital Collection, The independent v.53, Sept.-Dec. 1901

Center Church

“There are a few great human passions, such as the love of a man for one woman, the little child’s sense of justice, a man’s hatred of evil, or a patriot’s devotion; and among these great and ennobling passions belongs the passion for truth… it has been an architect and an iconoclast; it has built great creeds and it has burned them up; it has called forth grand uprisings of peoples, led hosts to battle-fields and solitary martyrs to the flames; it has been one of the great historic forces; and it has kept burning the light of may a lonely light in its vigil and dream. Not to feel this passion for truth is ignoble. Without it criticism, literature, art, scholarship, are without light and leading. It was a former professor of Divinity in Yale who once said in his class-room: ‘Follow truth, though it takes you over Niagara.’ In this great passion Yale is to keep its heritage…

No thinking can be profoundly true, if it be thought held apart from life. Scholastic lore may be gathered without communication with the movements of human life; as a landscape may have in it mere pockets where a marshy pond may lie surrounded by the reeds and with no out-flowing stream, deep as it may be, but stagnant; true wisdom will be living sympathy with the thoughts of men’s hearts, a pure wisdom overflowing into the world’s life; the College which possesses it will be more like the lake among the mountains, itself kept full from its own pure springs, and the stream flowing which sets in motion the humming industries of the valley. Our New England colleges, in their origin and through their unfailing influence, belong to the people, and to the life of the people. Their great teachers have been citizens as well as scholars.”
-Excerpt courtesy of, “THE RECORD OF THE CELEBRATION OF THE TWO HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FOUNDING OF YALE COLLEGE, HELD AT YALE UNIVERSITY, IN NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, OCTOBER THE TWENTIETH TO OCTOBER THE TWENTY-THIRD, A. D. NINETEEN HUNDRED AND ONE,” “Yale and the Kingdom of God, by the Reverend Newman Smyth, D.D.,” Yale University, 1902. (above) Image courtesy of the HathiTrust Digital Library, Princeton University, Yale Alumni Weekly, “The bicentennial: issue of commemoration. An illustrated account of the celebration of the two hundredth anniversary of the founding of Yale … October [20-23] 1901,” Yale University, 1902

United Church

“Now we are all agreed that during the two hundred years that have passed since the Collegiate School came into being, a vast advance has been made in almost all respects. These days of celebration will be spent in hearing the story and contemplating the results of our progress, — not only our visible achievements, but our gains in educational methods, in morals, and in manners. It would be absurd to doubt for a moment that the improvement has been great and genuine. Our curriculum — to fix attention upon one of the most significant facts — was then narrow, and it is now broad. In our mental range in the scope of our influence we were then provincial; we are now cosmopolitan. But what shall we say of our progress in things divine?”
-Excerpt courtesy of, “THE RECORD OF THE CELEBRATION OF THE TWO HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FOUNDING OF YALE COLLEGE, HELD AT YALE UNIVERSITY, IN NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, OCTOBER THE TWENTIETH TO OCTOBER THE TWENTY-THIRD, A. D. NINETEEN HUNDRED AND ONE,” “Scholarship and the Study of God, by the Reverend Joseph Andreson, D.D.,” Yale University, 1902. (above) Image courtesy of the HathiTrust Digital Library, Princeton University, Yale Alumni Weekly, “The bicentennial: issue of commemoration. An illustrated account of the celebration of the two hundredth anniversary of the founding of Yale … October [20-23] 1901,” Yale University, 1902

Yale in Its Relation to Christian Theology and Missions, by Professor George Park Fisher

“On Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock, Professor Fisher, D.D., LL.D., Dean of the Divinity School, delivered an address in the Battell Chapel on ‘Yale in Its Relation to Christian Theology and Missions.’ This address showed the large share Yale had had during the past two hundred years in developing the theological thought of the Western hemisphere…”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, “The Trinity archive [serial],” Volume 15 (1901-1902), by Trinity College (Durham, N.C.), “The Yale Bicentennial Celebration,” by Dr. W. I. Cranford

“Those to whom the name of Edwards calls up only the image of a dry reasoner or of an austere preacher, presenting detailed pictures of the sufferings of lost souls, should read the meditations on the ‘beauty and sweetness’ — I use his own words… ‘the appearance of everything was altered; there seemed to be, as it were, a calm, sweet cast, or appearance of divine glory in almost everything; in the sun, moon and stars; in the clouds and blue sky; in the grass, flowers, trees; in the water and all nature; which used greatly to fix my mind…’ He would have sympathized with Wordsworth’s ‘Lines above Tintern Abbey,’ only infusing into them a more theistic tinge:

‘I have felt
A presence that disturbs me with the joy
Of elevated thoughts, a sense sublime
Of something far more deeply infused,
Whose dwelling is the light of setting suns,
And the round ocean and the living air,
And the blue sky, and in the mind of man.'”

-Excerpt courtesy of, “THE RECORD OF THE CELEBRATION OF THE TWO HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FOUNDING OF YALE COLLEGE, HELD AT YALE UNIVERSITY, IN NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, OCTOBER THE TWENTIETH TO OCTOBER THE TWENTY-THIRD, A. D. NINETEEN HUNDRED AND ONE,” “Yale in Its Relation to Christian Theology and Missions, by Professor George Park Fisher,” Yale University, 1902. (above) Image courtesy of the HathiTrust Digital Library, Princeton University, Yale Alumni Weekly, “The bicentennial: issue of commemoration. An illustrated account of the celebration of the two hundredth anniversary of the founding of Yale … October [20-23] 1901,” Yale University, 1902

“On Sunday evening at 8 o’clock, Professor Harry B. Jepson gave an organ recital in the Battel Chapel. This was in harmony with the spirit of the occasion, and was beautiful and grand beyond description. Although having gone through a busy day on Sunday, the celebration awoke early and with renewed energy on Monday morning.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, “The Trinity archive [serial],” Volume 15 (1901-1902), by Trinity College (Durham, N.C.), “The Yale Bicentennial Celebration,” by Dr. W. I. Cranford

-Image courtesy of ctpostcards.net, Battell Chapel, Yale University, New Haven, Conn., undated

Monday, October 21, 1901

-Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New-York tribune, October 22, 1901

DEDICATION OF THE ’96 GATEWAY

Harry Johnson Fisher’s speech presenting the Cheney-Ives Gateway to Yale University on behalf of the class of 1896

“President Hadley and Yale Men: — I am here as a representative of the class of ninety-six, to present to you this gate. In its stone and iron it typifies the rugged manliness of those to whose lasting memory it has been erected. That is our wish. To you who are now gathered beneath these elms, and to those Yale men who shall follow after us, we wish this memorial to stand first of all for the manhood and courage of Yale. In the evening shadows the softer lights may steal forth and infold it, but through the daylight hours of toil and accomplishment let the sun shine down upon it, and bring out each line of strength, that every Yale man may be imbued with that dauntless spirit which inspired these two sons of Yale in their lives and in their deaths.

“We do not wish you merely to stand before this memorial and gaze upon it as a monument. We want every one of you, whether graduate at Commencement or undergraduate in term time, to come to it and to sit upon its benches, just as we of ninety-six shall come to it during the advancing years, and, in the coming, keep always alive in our hearts the spirit of these two who did their work and held their peace, and had no fear to die. That is the lesson these two careers are singularly fitted to teach us. To the one came the keenest disappointment which can come to a soldier, the disappointment of staying behind, and after that the toil, the drudgery, and the sickness, — all bravely borne. To the other it was given to meet death with that steadfast courage which alone avails to men who die in the long quiet after the battle. It is no new service these two have given to Yale. Looking back to-day through the heritage of two countries, these names are but added to the roll of those who have served Yale because they have served their country.

The stone and iron of this gate will keep alive the names of these two men. It is our hope that the men of Yale will, in their own lives, perpetuate their manhood and courage.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “The Speech for Special Occasions,” by Ella Adelaide Knapp, 1912. (above) Image courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “Decennial record of the class of 1896, Yale College,” by Clarence Day, Yale University, 1907

Arthur Twining Hadley’s Speech of acceptance of the Cheney-Ives Gateway

“Of all the memorials which are offered to a university by the gratitude of her sons, there are none which serve so closely and fully the purposes of her life as those monuments which commemorate her dead heroes. The most important part of the teaching of a place like Yale is found in the lessons of public spirit and devotion to high ideals which it gives. These things can in some measure be learned in books of poetry and of history. They can in some measure be learned from the daily life of the college and the sentiments which it inculcates. But they are most solemnly and vividly brought home by visible signs, such as this gateway furnishes, that the spirit of ancient heroism is not dead, and that its highest lessons are not lost.

It seems as if the bravest and best in your class, as well as in others, had been sacrificed to the cruel exigencies of war. But they are not sacrificed. It is through their death that their spirit remains immortal. ‘That rivers flow into the sea / Is loss and waste, the foolish say; Nor know that back they find their way / Unseen, from whence they wont to be. Showers fall upon the earth, springs flow; The river runneth close at hand; Brave men are born into the land, And whence, the foolish do not know.’

It is through men like those whom we have loved, and whom we here commemorate, that the life of the republic is kept alive. As we have learned lessons of heroism from the men who went forth to die in the Civil War, so will our children and our children’s children learn the same lesson from the heroes who have a little while lived with us and then entered into an immortality of glory.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “The Speech for Special Occasions,” by Ella Adelaide Knapp, 1912. (above) Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, The Barre Evening Telegram (Barre, Vermont), Saturday, October 12, 1901

Addresses on Law and Medicine at Battell Chapel

“Entrance to Battell Chapel, Yale University.” -Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, Richmond daily palladium (Richmon, Indiana), October 21, 1901

Introduction of Mr. Thacher, by the Honorable Simeon E. Baldwin, LL.D.

“We heard yesterday, from Professor Fisher, of Yale in its relation to Theology. With a sister science — one might perhaps better say a daughter science — Yale from her early years has also come in closest contact. There are ministers of justice among her sons in greater numbers even than ministers of religion. Of them we are to learn from one of their number, who, in the greatest city of this land of this hemisphere, has won a leader’s place at a bar accustomed to deal with great affairs.

The name which he has inherited was, in my college days, and for a long generation, one of the most familiar and dearest which the student knew. It stood for a commanding personality in Professor Thacher. It stood for a thorough devotion to Yale, to the full measure of his opportunities; and a like devotion, in another walk of life, to the full measure of his opportunities, has been shown by the son. He has found time, or has made time, for ten years past, to assist in the work of instruction in our Law School, and, as president of the Yale Club of New York, was one of those at whose creative touch, in a brief seven months, there rose out of the ground, as by a magician’s wand, the stately structure in which that club now offers a fitting center for the Yale life in the Empire State.

I have the honor of introducing Thomas Thacher, of the New York bar.”
-Excerpt courtesy of, “THE RECORD OF THE CELEBRATION OF THE TWO HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FOUNDING OF YALE COLLEGE, HELD AT YALE UNIVERSITY, IN NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, OCTOBER THE TWENTIETH TO OCTOBER THE TWENTY-THIRD, A. D. NINETEEN HUNDRED AND ONE,” “Introduction of Mr. Thacher, by the Honorable Simeon E. Baldwin, LL.D.,” Yale University, 1902. (above) Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, The Columbian (Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania), December 14, 1899

Yale in its Relation to Law, by Thomas Thacher, M.A.

“Mr. President, Alumni, and Friends of Yale: Is it not a little hard that the words which call me to my feet carry so much of kindness, of honor, of suggestion, as well-nigh to rob me of the power of utterance? And those words have, in one respect, special force, because of the source from which they come. For behind the speaker, out of the memories of childhood, arises the form of his father, an ideal Yale lawyer of the old school — Roger Sherman Baldwin, advocate, counselor, jurist, senator, governor. Could I clearly paint his picture and show his life, with the surroundings of the times, I might perhaps well substitute this for much of what I have written…

Roger Sherman, too, in some degree belonged to Yale college, having been its treasurer for ten years and more…

There is, however, one graduate of Yale whose name must occur to all, one who enjoyed unique opportunities and in them won unusual distinction and rendered unusual service. I need hardly say that I refer to William M. Evarts. When the conflict between Andrew Johnson and the dominant party in Congress led to the impeachment of the President, it was his privilege to appear in his defense before the Senate of the United States, sitting for the first time in a case of grand consequence as a court of impeachment. He successfully contended against a view of the relative powers of Congress and the Executive which, if established, would have destroyed the balance intended by the framers of the Constitution. On what a high plane did he put the discussion! With what dignity and force did he hold the tribunal to its high responsibilities, to its duty to act as a court and not as politicians, nor even as statesmen! By clear exposition and logical argument, by lofty and dignified eloquence, and by occasional humor, relieving the tension and sending his points home, he made clear, so that none could overlook it, the purpose of the Constitution to make of the President, not an employee of Congress bound to do its bidding, but an independent coordinate branch of a well-balanced government, being protected by the Constitution, and having the right and the duty to determine his course thereunder free from congressional coercion…”
-Excerpt courtesy of, “THE RECORD OF THE CELEBRATION OF THE TWO HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FOUNDING OF YALE COLLEGE, HELD AT YALE UNIVERSITY, IN NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, OCTOBER THE TWENTIETH TO OCTOBER THE TWENTY-THIRD, A. D. NINETEEN HUNDRED AND ONE,” “Introduction of Mr. Thacher, by the Honorable Simeon E. Baldwin, LL.D.,” Yale University, 1902. (above) Image courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Boston Globe, Monday Evening, October 21, 1901

Yale in its Relation to Medicine, by Professor William Henry Welch, LL.D.

“Welch’s address, ‘Yale in Relation to Medicine,’ was delivered at Battell Chapel on October 21, 1901. Although Welch praised the dedication of the Yale medical faculty for its continued efforts to raise the standards of medical education, he suggested that Yale had a long way to go before it could be considered a great medical school. He concluded: ‘…medical teaching and research can no longer be successfully carried on with the meagre appliances of the past. They require large endowments, many well equipped and properly supported laboratories, and a body of well paid teachers thoroughly trained in their special departments. With an ampler supply of such opportunities as these there is every reason to believe that the Yale Medical Department would take that important position in the great forward march of modern medicine to which its origin, its honorable history, and the fame of this ancient University entitle it. May the next Jubilee find medicine holding a high position in Yale University.'”
-Excerpt courtesy of Yale University, “Medicine at Yale, 1810-2010, Prelude to a Transformation, 1900-1910, Welch’s Bicentennial Address,” 2010. (above) Image courtesy of the Internet Archive, Cornell University Library, “The biographical record of the class of 1870, Yale College, 1870-1911,” by Lewis Wilder Hicks, Yale University, 1911

Address of Welcome, by President Arthur Twining Hadley

“Of all the pleasures and the duties which a birthday brings with it, the most welcome duty and the most exalted pleasure is found in the opportunity which it affords for seeing, united under one roof, the fellow-members of a family who are often so far separated. On this two hundredth birthday of Yale University, it is our chief pride to have with us the representatives of that brotherhood of learning which knows no bounds of time or place, of profession or creed.

It knows no bound of age, either among the hosts or among the guests. The Yale that welcomes you here includes in its membership all parts of the collegiate body, from the youngest student to the oldest professor. It includes all those who, coming here with out officially recognized connection with the University itself, bear to it such relationship that they partake in its spirit, and feel themselves sharers of its glories and its duties. Nor is it the living alone that welcome you. Present with us in spirit are men who have recently gone from us, like Phelps and Dana and Whitney. Present is a long line of great dead who have devoted their services to Yale, and who, being dead, yet speak. Present are those givers of books who, two hundred years ago, out of their poverty founded that college in the colony of Connecticut which to-day welcomes brothers younger and older to its anniversary. Representatives of colleges whose birth we have watched and in whose growth we can claim an almost paternal interest stand here side by side with delegates from those institutions, whether in the New World or in the Old, which can point to a longer past than ours, and with whose achievements the centuries have rung…”
-Excerpt courtesy of, “THE RECORD OF THE CELEBRATION OF THE TWO HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FOUNDING OF YALE COLLEGE, HELD AT YALE UNIVERSITY, IN NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, OCTOBER THE TWENTIETH TO OCTOBER THE TWENTY-THIRD, A. D. NINETEEN HUNDRED AND ONE,” “Address of Welcome, by President Arthur Twining Hadley,” Yale University, 1902. (above) Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, Freie Presse für Texas, October 24, 1901
“Our brotherhood knows no bounds of place, no limits natural or artificial. Characteristic of university learning from the very beginning was its cosmopolitan spirit. While states and cities dwelt in self-centered isolation, the universities of the Middle Ages established the first post-office by which intelligence could be interchanged and nations grow by one another’s intellectual work. That community of thought which the members of the brotherhood of learning have thus pursued from the out- set has been in recent days helped beyond anticipation by those modern inventions which have annihilated space, and have made it possible to have with us representatives not only from the North and the South, from the Mississippi and from the Pacific, but from Stockholm and St. Petersburg, from Japan and from Australasia.

Our brotherhood knows no bounds of occupation. The day is past when people thought of the learned professions as something set apart from all others, the exclusive property of a privileged few. Opinions may differ as to the achievements of democracy; hut none can fail to value that growing democracy of letters which makes of every calling a learned and noble profession, when it is pursued with the clearness of vision which is furnished by science or by history, and with the disinterested devotion to the public welfare which true learning inspires. We are proud to have with us not only the theologian, the jurist, or the physician; not merely the historical investigator or the scientific discoverer; but the men of every name who by arms or by arts, in letters or in commerce, have contributed to bring all callings equally within the scope of university life.

Nor does our brotherhood know any bound of creed. Even those institutions of learning which at some period in their history have had a more or less sectarian character tend to grow as the world grows — making their theology no longer a trammel but an inspiration, and welcoming as friends all who contribute to that inspiration, whether under the same forms or under others. Our common religion, so fundamental that we can all unite therein, teaches us broad lessons of reverence, of tolerance, and of earnestness. Ours be the reverence of those who have learned silence from the stars above and the graves beneath; ours the tolerance which can ‘see a good in evil, and a hope in ill-success’; ours the earnestness which would waste no time in the discussion of differences of standpoint, but would unite us as leaders in the world’s great movement toward higher standards in science and in business, in thought and in life.”
-Excerpt courtesy of, “THE RECORD OF THE CELEBRATION OF THE TWO HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FOUNDING OF YALE COLLEGE, HELD AT YALE UNIVERSITY, IN NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, OCTOBER THE TWENTIETH TO OCTOBER THE TWENTY-THIRD, A. D. NINETEEN HUNDRED AND ONE,” “Address of Welcome, by President Arthur Twining Hadley,” Yale University, 1902. (above) Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, Freie Presse für Texas, October 24, 1901

YALE’S TORCHLIGHT PARADE.

Streets Over Which the Parade Passed Were in a Blaze of Light — The Curbs Lined With Thousands Along Entire Line of March — One of the Largest Crowds Which Has Ever Been in New Haven — Beautiful Illumination of the Central Green.

“It was only a handful of the Class that gathered around the Ninety-Six Gateway, on Monday morning, to hear Fisher’s words of dedication, but their hearts were big with pride to think of Cheney and Ives, and their eyes were satisfied with the memorial.
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “Decennial record of the class of 1896, Yale College,” by Clarence Day, Yale University, 1907. (above) Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New-York tribune, October 22, 1901
“That was the Monday, or the second day set apart for Yale’s Bicentennial celebration. Not many of the Class had come, but enough to have a class meeting in A2 Osborn, when the dutiful Secretary promised us a tuneful band for the evening, but begged us to realize that some one must account for its enthusiasm. This was met with long-green equanimity; but the meeting flew into a passion of roaring pain when the quaking Nettleton read a telegram from some irresponsible member in New York, to wit: ‘Spent a mint for transparencies; collect from Class.'”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “Decennial record of the class of 1896, Yale College,” by Clarence Day, Yale University, 1907. (above) Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New-York tribune, October 22, 1901
“Calm words of courage, threats of vengeance and subsidence by way of oaths, lowered the temperature — and raised the money.
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “Decennial record of the class of 1896, Yale College,” by Clarence Day, Yale University, 1907. (above) Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New-York tribune, October 22, 1901
All through the afternoon the Class registration list kept growing at the Library, where the new arrivals received from Dickerman and Farr the bronze medals for graduates, that passed us in and out the campus gates. Ninety-Six men wandered about bewildered to see New Haven blooming in blue, and startled at the echoing hammers of carpenters erecting play-houses and stands on the campus.”
-Excerpt and image courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “Decennial record of the class of 1896, Yale College,” by Clarence Day, Yale University, 1907. (above) Image courtesy of the HathiTrust Digital Library, Princeton University, Yale Alumni Weekly, “The bicentennial: issue of commemoration. An illustrated account of the celebration of the two hundredth anniversary of the founding of Yale … October [20-23] 1901,” Yale University, 1902
“At Osborn Hall, post-graduate tailors were fitting blue muslin gowns to broad-bosomed alumni, and there was a despairing trying on of hats; torches were plucked from the carpenter shop, and by seven o’clock every one was accoutred with the proper Bicentennial parade insignia — every one except Gris. Smith, who, at the last moment, noisily burst past the guards at the Memorial Gateway.”
Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “Decennial record of the class of 1896, Yale College,” by Clarence Day, Yale University, 1907. (above) Image courtesy of ctpostcards.net, “Osborn Hall, Yale University, New Haven, Conn.,” undated
“One stalwart member was instructed to keep the side which said ‘Anson Stokes belongs to us,’ constantly toward the grandstand. The Class band arrived, and inquired in vain for Nettleton.”
Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “Decennial record of the class of 1896, Yale College,” by Clarence Day, Yale University, 1907. (above) Image courtesy of the Yale Daily News Historical Archive, Yale University, Yale Daily News no. 22, October 21 1901
He found the Class gathered at the corner of South Middle. They stood amid smoking torches, whose glare lit up the mottoed lights whereupon were writ the claims of Ninety-Six to glory.”
Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “Decennial record of the class of 1896, Yale College,” by Clarence Day, Yale University, 1907. (above) Image courtesy of the HathiTrust Digital Library, Princeton University, Yale Alumni Weekly, “The bicentennial: issue of commemoration. An illustrated account of the celebration of the two hundredth anniversary of the founding of Yale … October [20-23] 1901,” Yale University, 1902
“Then Twombly’s Kazoo Band arrived; it played, Ninety-Six howled with delight, and the University laughed and admired the stunt.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “Decennial record of the class of 1896, Yale College,” by Clarence Day, Yale University, 1907. (above) Image courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Boston Globe, Friday, May 13, 1892
“By eight o’clock the campus was packed with thousands of flickering lights; the air reeked with stifling smoke, and a hundred bands clashed stridently. Great flambeaux capped with burning pitch intermittently did light the towering walls, and the trees above in the dismal mist looked weird.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “Decennial record of the class of 1896, Yale College,” by Clarence Day, Yale University, 1907. (above) Image courtesy of Prints Old & Rare, Colleges and Universities, “Hand colored half-tone showing the Most Spectacular Feature of the Yale Bi-Centennial Celebration. Featured in Leslie’s Weekly,” by T. Dart Walker, 1901
The undergraduates swung off, the costume of each class delighting us — Indians, cowboys, sailors and all; then came the graduates from old to young, when Ninety-Six, headed by Brinck Thorne and Nettleton, marched in its turn.
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “Decennial record of the class of 1896, Yale College,” by Clarence Day, Yale University, 1907. (above) Image courtesy of the HathiTrust Digital Library, Princeton University, Yale Alumni Weekly, “The bicentennial: issue of commemoration. An illustrated account of the celebration of the two hundredth anniversary of the founding of Yale … October [20-23] 1901,” Yale University, 1902
“Up this street and down that we marched, with a great Ninety-Six transparency at our head, and always Twombly’s Kazoo Band creating amusement, till we reached the reviewing stand.”
-Excerpt and image courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “Decennial record of the class of 1896, Yale College,” by Clarence Day, Yale University, 1907
“Why speak of presidents, governors, mayors — for there sat our Anson, who rose to say — ‘Dear Classmates: You from whom among…’ Clash, bang went the cymbals and drum of Twombly’s Band, and Boolah wheezed over the deafened crowd as the Class marched gaily by.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “Decennial record of the class of 1896, Yale College,” by Clarence Day, Yale University, 1907. (above) Image courtesy of the HathiTrust Digital Library, Princeton University, Yale Alumni Weekly, “The bicentennial: issue of commemoration. An illustrated account of the celebration of the two hundredth anniversary of the founding of Yale … October [20-23] 1901,” Yale University, 1902
“In the darkness of the streets the bandmaster cried for light, and Bentley, steady and true with his torch — always in step with the music — was placed within the midst. Loughran and Spellman were link boys on the side, and that was the order of the march. Shortly before twelve the parade was over, and fleetly was the rank dispersed for there were thirsty throats.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “Decennial record of the class of 1896, Yale College,” by Clarence Day, Yale University, 1907. (above) Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New York Tribune, Tuesday, October 22, 1901
“On the campus a great bonfire was started, and through the early morning hours Ninety-Six straggled away to bed; a few groups of wakeful under-graduates were left and finally they departed, leaving the fire to die in a warm glow of embers. Only a distant and infrequent sound from an echoing entry was heard; the air was cleared of smoke, and keen. There were the old walls, clean cut against the sky, the old silent trees, the Fence, Durfee, with a light or two, and black Alumni Hall. In the midst of these I stood, and swaying with a thousand memories whispered, — ‘Good night, Yale! Good night, old Yale.'”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “Decennial record of the class of 1896, Yale College,” by Clarence Day, Yale University, 1907. (above) Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, The World (New York, New York), Tuesday, October 22, 1901
NEW HAVEN ABLAZE. Imposing as was the dignity and impressive as was ‘he significance of that notable assembly and symposium in Battell Chapel in the afternoon, by far the most spectacular feature of the day was the torchlight procession of soldiers, naval militia, under graduates and alumni that set the streets ablaze and filled the air with a mile and a half of lusty, full throated salutations to Alma Mater to-night. Thousands of paraders repaired to designated points in the late hours of the afternoon to secure the costumes and torches that had been procured for their use. Scarcely had the night shut in when thousands of orange lanterns strung in long loops about the dormitories and halls began to shed a gentle radiance over the campus and the streets. At the same time the electric display on the city green began to make itself felt and in half an hour New-Haven had clad itself in a gorgeous gown of many colors, whose harmony was the result of one great plan. Artists had ordered the illumination, and its beauty alone was well worth a long journey to see.

At 8 o’clock the streets were packed with thousands of sightseers, so that it was almost impossible to find one’s way about. Bands of curiously costumed alumni pushed their way resolutely toward the appointed rendezvous on the campus, while the blare of a score of bands filled the air with a maze of sounds.”
Excerpt courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New-York Tribune, Tuesday, October 22, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Hartford Courant, Tuesday, October 22, 1901
“THE PROCESSION STARTS. On the reviewing stand in front of the hall were gathered Governor McLean, Mayor Studley, the members of the Yale Corporation and the municipal government. The parade started promptly through the Phelps Gate, when a great flare of red fire behind Welch Hall announced that the procession was in motion. Headed by the grand marshal the line of fire proceeded through College and Chapel sts. to Church-st., where it turned to the left, and so passed the reviewing stand, saluting the notables who stood there.”
Excerpt courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New-York Tribune, Tuesday, October 22, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of the Yale Daily News Historical Archive, Yale University, Yale Daily News No. 22, Monday, October 21, 1901
First came the military, including the 2d Regiment of Connecticut, in command of Colonel Suker, and the Governor’s Foot and Horse Guards and the naval militia. A band of whooping befeathered and bepainted Indians followed. They were the class of ’02, and a transparency announced that they were the ‘Pequot Tribe.’ Sheffield, ’02, were clad as Pilgrim fathers, and marched with becoming dignity, every man’s face being clean shaven; ’03 was garbed in Colonial fashion, with blue coats and three cornered hats. They had dubbed themselves ‘Washington’s Bodyguard.’ Sheffield. ’03, wore the dress of 1812, with the enormous flaring hats of that period. The ‘bluejackets of ’01’ were hard on their heels, and next were the ‘Rough Riders of ’05’ in cowboy costume. The Medical School undergraduates wore green caps and gowns, and escorted the latest thing in ambulances, a Red Cross automobile. The Divinity School was all in red, and was preceded by an arch of fire representing, presumably, the seven candlesticks. Behind them were home transparencies representing ‘Jonathan Edwards at Saybrooke,’ ‘Saybrooke uniting a happy couple in marriage’ and ‘Jim Hyde in Africa,’ who was apparently instructing Zulus in the noble game of football. The Law School wore the Judicial purple, and the members of the Forestry School were all Robin Hoods and their garments of the green wood. Thirty Japanese students were cheered all along the line.”
Excerpt courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New-York Tribune, Tuesday, October 22, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of the HathiTrust Digital Library, Princeton University, Yale Alumni Weekly, “The bicentennial: issue of commemoration. An illustrated account of the celebration of the two hundredth anniversary of the founding of Yale … October [20-23] 1901,” Yale University, 1902
A GREAT HOST OF ALUMNI. Then followed the alumni, a great host, beginning with ex-Judge Henry E. Howland and the Rev. Dr. Joseph Twichell.

‘Whoop it up for ’74!’ met the eye soon afterward, and the adjuration was followed with a will. The class of ’76, President Hadley’s class, patted itself on the back with illuminated remarks like ”76 Brainard Brown’; ‘Hadley’s class; Yale made ’76; ’76 made Hadley,’ and others. ‘Flower of the Vine,’ ’70 announced itself to be, while it was glowingly announced that ”81 would never be outdone.'”
Excerpt courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New-York Tribune, Tuesday, October 22, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Hartford Courant, Tuesday, October 22, 1901
A later band of alumni modestly declared ‘This is the famous class of ’91.’ With ’93 the ‘class boy’ rode in a coat cart, while ’94 announced: ‘1701. 1894, 1901— Greatest Dates in Yale’s History.’ The class of ’96 glorified its pyromaniac exploits thus: ‘We tried to burn the treasury’; ‘Burning of the soap factory.’ Then came a big band of the latest made alumni. Long battalions of them locked arms and weaved their joyous way from curb to curb singing the old song, commemorative of the freshman society. ‘We Meet To-night to Celebrate Omega Lambda Chi.'”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New-York Tribune, Tuesday, October 22, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of the Yale Daily News Historical Archive, Yale University, Yale Daily News no. 22, October 21 1901
“The procession had twenty-four bands, all hard worked, and was an hour and a quarter in passing the reviewing stand. The New-Haven police worked manfully to manage the huge crowd, but the task was all but too much for them. The parade finished where it had begun, on the campus, and there was a mock fight between the Indians and the Colonials in which the costumes were the principal sufferers. Reviewing stands were in every block and most of them were packed. It was a gorgeous pageant, and sections of it paraded in squads and quartets and trios wherever it listed until early in the morning.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New-York Tribune, Tuesday, October 22, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of HathiTrust Digital Collections, “The Yale Banner, Volume LX,” by John B. Hart, Lyman S. Spitzer, Yale University, December 1901
-Image courtesy of HathiTrust Digital Collections, “The Yale Banner, Volume LX,” by John B. Hart, Lyman S. Spitzer, Yale University, December 1901

Tuesday, October 22

Addresses on the Development of the Country, Science and Letters at Battell Chapel

-Image courtesy of the HathiTrust Digital Library, Princeton University, Yale Alumni Weekly, “The bicentennial: issue of commemoration. An illustrated account of the celebration of the two hundredth anniversary of the founding of Yale … October [20-23] 1901,” Yale University, 1902

Yale in its Relation to Science and Letters, by President Cyrus Northrop, LL.D.

“While Yale men have gone largely into politics and have done manly service in the ranks, and while many of them have attained to distinguished positions to which they have done honor in which they have been influential, it is not easy to say to what extent the political policy of our country has been influenced directly by Yale… No graduate of Yale has ever been elected to the office of President of the United States; but Yalensians will not complain so long as the country can have for its president such a patriot and scholar as Theodore Roosevelt.”
-Excerpt courtesy of, “THE RECORD OF THE CELEBRATION OF THE TWO HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FOUNDING OF YALE COLLEGE, HELD AT YALE UNIVERSITY, IN NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, OCTOBER THE TWENTIETH TO OCTOBER THE TWENTY-THIRD, A. D. NINETEEN HUNDRED AND ONE,” “Address of Welcome, by President Arthur Twining Hadley,” Yale University, 1902. (above) Image courtesy of the HathiTrust Digital Library, Princeton University, Yale Alumni Weekly, “The bicentennial: issue of commemoration. An illustrated account of the celebration of the two hundredth anniversary of the founding of Yale … October [20-23] 1901,” Yale University, 1902

The Relation of Yale to Letters and Science, by Daniel Coit Gilman, LL.D.

“The Collegiate School of Connecticut began well; Yale College improved upon the Collegiate School; Yale University is better than Yale College. The process has been that of evolution, not of revolution; unfolding, not cataclysmic; growth, and not manufacture; heredity and environment, the controlling factors. What we are we owe to our ancestry and our opportunities. Hence the Relations of Yale to Letters and Science cannot be adequately treated without looking outside the walls as well as inside, — by considering the wilderness of Quinnipiac; the dependence of the colony upon the mother country; the bicephalous State of Connecticut; the prosperous city of New Haven and its proximity to the great metropolis; and especially by considering what has been going on in the macrocosm of literature and knowledge where we represent a microcosm…

Nor can I forget… the other graduates of this College who went to the Pacific coast, ‘with college on the brain,’ and planted in California the seeds of learning, which now bear harvests of golden grain. A happy thought gave the name of Berkeley to the site near the Golden Gate, where an institution, begun by our brothers, fulfills the remarkable prophecies of Timothy Dwight, written in 1794:

‘All hail, thou Western World! by heaven designed
The example bright to renovate mankind!
Soon shall thy sons across the mainland roam
And claim on fair Pacific’s shore a home.

Where marshes teemed with death, shall meads unfold,
Untrodden cliffs resign their stores of gold.
Where slept perennial night, shall science rise,
And new-born Oxfords cheer the evening skies!'”
-Excerpt courtesy of, “THE RECORD OF THE CELEBRATION OF THE TWO HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FOUNDING OF YALE COLLEGE, HELD AT YALE UNIVERSITY, IN NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, OCTOBER THE TWENTIETH TO OCTOBER THE TWENTY-THIRD, A. D. NINETEEN HUNDRED AND ONE,” “Address of Welcome, by President Arthur Twining Hadley,” Yale University, 1902. (above) Image courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Boston Globe, Tuesday, October 22, 1901
“Things were happening in Battell Chapel. This was Tuesday morning. Some were taking the trouble to watch the gowned backs going in, but mostly Ninety-Six was sitting on the Fence gossiping and waiting for lunch. After that the class picture was taken in front of the Gateway, with Twombly’s Band doing a fanfare in the front row.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “Decennial record of the class of 1896, Yale College,” by Clarence Day, Yale University, 1907. (above) Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New-York tribune, October 23, 1901
“No secondary brass band had been hired to escort the Class to the football game at the field, so that when the undergraduates with their bands formed a column to march out Chapel Street, Ninety-Six found it necessary to head the column in order to have hireling music. The Class was headed by Twombly’s Band — the feature of the entire parade. The band was led by Weyerhaeuser. His figure was grand. In his hand he held a great curtain rod covered with white enamel; on each end of the rod there was a brass ball. Treadway played the cymbals.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “Decennial record of the class of 1896, Yale College,” by Clarence Day, Yale University, 1907. (above) Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New-York tribune, October 23, 1901
“When the field was reached we marched round it, and cheer after cheer went up from each class passed by; this proved so pleasing that we perambulated again with like effect, and then took seats.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “Decennial record of the class of 1896, Yale College,” by Clarence Day, Yale University, 1907. (above) Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New-York tribune, October 23, 1901
“Football was played and much music. On the return the paid bands and costumed under-graduates went off to get what glory they might. But the main column was led by Ninety-Six. Beside it on the walks almost the oldest living graduates kept step, and their families too, while in front shrill newsboys turned cartwheels, and behind followed the mute rabblement.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “Decennial record of the class of 1896, Yale College,” by Clarence Day, Yale University, 1907. (above) Image courtesy of the HathiTrust Digital Library, Princeton University, Yale Alumni Weekly, “The bicentennial: issue of commemoration. An illustrated account of the celebration of the two hundredth anniversary of the founding of Yale … October [20-23] 1901,” Yale University, 1902
“The campus was reached. The Class disbanded, and that was the end of the afternoon’s divertisement.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “Decennial record of the class of 1896, Yale College,” by Clarence Day, Yale University, 1907. (above) Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New-York tribune, October 23, 1901

YALE’S SONS SING HER PRAISES

The Guonod Society and New Have Symphony Orchestra’s Performance of “Hora Novissima” at the Hyperion Theatre and the Bicentennial Campus Celebration at the Amphitheatre

“On Tuesday afternoon the Gounod Society, the New-Haven Symphony Orchestra and a quartet of solo singers will perform Professor Parker’s oratorio, ‘Hora Novissima,’ at the Hyperion Theatre, and in the evening college songs will resound from thousands of throats in the campus and amphitheatre.”
-Excerpt and image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New-York tribune, October 20, 1901
“A temporary stage had been built in the center of the Campus, fifty feet square and five feet above the ground, facing north. An amphitheater faced the stage, with tiers of seats inclosing a ground space of about ten thousand square feet, — the latter filled with rows of benches.”
-Excerpt courtesy of, “THE RECORD OF THE CELEBRATION OF THE TWO HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FOUNDING OF YALE COLLEGE, HELD AT YALE UNIVERSITY, IN NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, OCTOBER THE TWENTIETH TO OCTOBER THE TWENTY-THIRD, A. D. NINETEEN HUNDRED AND ONE,” Yale University, 1902. (above) Image courtesy of HathiTrust Digital Collections, “The Yale Banner, Volume LX,” by John B. Hart, Lyman S. Spitzer, Yale University, December 1901
“Here, on Tuesday, October 22, at 8 P. M., before an audience of eight or nine thousand, the Yale Dramatic Association presented ten scenes illustrating Yale history.”
-Excerpt courtesy of, “THE RECORD OF THE CELEBRATION OF THE TWO HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FOUNDING OF YALE COLLEGE, HELD AT YALE UNIVERSITY, IN NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, OCTOBER THE TWENTIETH TO OCTOBER THE TWENTY-THIRD, A. D. NINETEEN HUNDRED AND ONE,” Yale University, 1902. (above) Image courtesy of HathiTrust Digital Collections, “The Yale Banner, Volume LX,” by John B. Hart, Lyman S. Spitzer, Yale University, December 1901
In the intermissions the audience sang old college songs, led by a military band and a student choir of six hundred voices, trained for the occasion. As the audience were seated by classes, there was also much volunteer singing, besides other old-time demonstrations not set down on the program.”
-Excerpt courtesy of, “THE RECORD OF THE CELEBRATION OF THE TWO HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FOUNDING OF YALE COLLEGE, HELD AT YALE UNIVERSITY, IN NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, OCTOBER THE TWENTIETH TO OCTOBER THE TWENTY-THIRD, A. D. NINETEEN HUNDRED AND ONE,” Yale University, 1902. (above) Image courtesy of HathiTrust Digital Collections, “The Yale Banner, Volume LX,” by John B. Hart, Lyman S. Spitzer, Yale University, December 1901
“The next several scenes were announced by horn-calls, blown by two heralds from the corners of the stage, and prologues delivered before the curtain.
-Excerpt courtesy of, “THE RECORD OF THE CELEBRATION OF THE TWO HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FOUNDING OF YALE COLLEGE, HELD AT YALE UNIVERSITY, IN NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, OCTOBER THE TWENTIETH TO OCTOBER THE TWENTY-THIRD, A. D. NINETEEN HUNDRED AND ONE,” Yale University, 1902. (above) Image courtesy of HathiTrust Digital Collection, Harper’s Weekly, Vol. XLV, No. 2341, November 2, 1901
“In the evening there was a grand assemblage of the sons of Yale. They sat in banks, encircling a large amphitheatre. Placards showed where those classes sat who had forgot how to cheer, and cheers showed where classes with young, lusty lungs were gathered. Before the performance of the under-graduates began, songs were sung back and forth, middle-aged songs and the latest. Ninety-Six was inconspicuously placed in a dark angle of the benches; below it in the arena there were a sea of faces, and all around were shores of Yale men. The night was lighted with gigantic torches from which great columns of smoke wound upward through the elms.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “Decennial record of the class of 1896, Yale College,” by Clarence Day, Yale University, 1907. (above) Image courtesy of the HathiTrust Digital Library, Princeton University, Yale Alumni Weekly, “The bicentennial: issue of commemoration. An illustrated account of the celebration of the two hundredth anniversary of the founding of Yale … October [20-23] 1901,” Yale University, 1902
“The Class took its turn at shouting and singing, and fixed its eyes upon the play. Undergraduates in short tableaux did represent the history of Yale’s two centuries. The inspiration of Nathan Hale was deep; the mirth of college pranks was high. These courses were bonded with the old songs that Yale sang out a hundred years ago, songs made young again in Freshman throats.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “Decennial record of the class of 1896, Yale College,” by Clarence Day, Yale University, 1907. (above) Image courtesy of HathiTrust Digital Collection, Harper’s Weekly, Vol. XLV, No. 2341, November 2, 1901
The life of Yale was rounded out for us to look upon and know. Quietly and proudly Ninety-Six felt itself to be a part of that great life”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “Decennial record of the class of 1896, Yale College,” by Clarence Day, Yale University, 1907. (above) Image courtesy of HathiTrust Digital Collections, “The Yale Banner, Volume LX,” by John B. Hart, Lyman S. Spitzer, Yale University, December 1901
Resolutely the Class filed out that night, out into the next century for Yale.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “Decennial record of the class of 1896, Yale College,” by Clarence Day, Yale University, 1907. (above)
Image courtesy of the HathiTrust Digital Library, Princeton University, Yale Alumni Weekly, “The bicentennial: issue of commemoration. An illustrated account of the celebration of the two hundredth anniversary of the founding of Yale … October [20-23] 1901,” Yale University, 1902
-Image courtesy of HathiTrust Digital Collections, “The Yale Banner, Volume LX,” by John B. Hart, Lyman S. Spitzer, Yale University, December 1901

Wednesday, October 23

The Closing Day of Yale’s Bicentennial Celebration

Procession of Guests and Graduates to the Hyperion, as Escort to President Roosevelt

“President Roosevelt owned New Haven today as the honored guest of Yale university, on this, the closing day of her bi-centennial. And he captured Yale college too. He got a reception and it was one college cheer from the time President Roosevelt reached New Haven early this morning until he left the city at midnight on the Washington express bound for the capital.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Boston Globe, Wednesday, October 23, 1901
“President Roosevelt’s special train got to New Haven at 9:10, 20 minutes before the expected time. There was a multitude of Yule men at the station to greet the president. A general notion prevailed that the special would land the president at the station and the crowd there collected. The first intimation the people had that there had been a change in the programme and that the president would not alight from his train at the depot was when it was noticed that the military took a stand at a railroad crossing three blocks north of the station and were stationed to await the arrival of President Roosevelt. The thousands who had gathered at the depot immediately rushed to the military rendezvous and a few minutes later the train arrived bearing the president, Col. Bingham, Executive Secretary Cortelyou, Commander Cowles, U. S. N., the president’s brother-in-law, and Gov. McLean, of Connecticut. With the party were also Robert Ferguson, who was one of the rough riders, Miss Alice Roosevelt, the president’s daughter, the president’s sister, Mrs. Cowles, of Farmington, and Dr. Rixey.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. Image courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Chicago Tribune, Thursday, October, 24, 1901
“The president left his car and walked to the carriage in which was seated President Hadley of Yale, and Mayor Studley of New Haven. Thousands of people shouting and cheering the president lined the sidewalk all along the route from the railroad crossing, where he alighted, to the Yale campus, where other thousands had been standing for an hour waiting to greet him. Just as soon as President Roosevelt’s carriage rolled into the Yale campus, 5,000 Yale men who had assembled, gave him the college cheer and a strained chorus of 600 students sang ‘America.'”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Boston Globe, Thursday, October 24, 1901
“After arriving at the campus President Roosevelt drove over to Dwight hall, where were gathered the distinguished visiting college delegations that were to make up the academic procession. He was warmly received by the prominent scholars from every section of the country.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America
There he donned his academical robe and with the others filed out upon the campus. In the formation of that procession of renowned men, President Roosevelt had for his marching companion President Hadley, also in college robes.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of HathiTrust Digital Collections, “The Yale Banner, Volume LX,” by John B. Hart, Lyman S. Spitzer, Yale University, December 1901
“These two famous men were preceded first by Col. T. A. Bingham, the chief marshal, Prof. John C. Schwab, executive secretary of the bi-centennial committee, and Thomas Hooker, a distinguished son of Yale.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of HathiTrust Digital Collection, The independent v.53, Sept.-Dec. 1901
“Back of the two presidents were Gov. McLean, of Connecticut, and former President Dwight, representatives of the city government, all the Yale corporation, including Senator Chauncey M. Depew…”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901 (above)
Image courtesy of HathiTrust Digital Collection, Harper’s Weekly, Vol. XLV, No. 2341, November 2, 1901
“…and 500 more paraders, consisting of the presidents from nearly every college in the United States…”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of the HathiTrust Digital Library, Princeton University, Yale Alumni Weekly, “The bicentennial: issue of commemoration. An illustrated account of the celebration of the two hundredth anniversary of the founding of Yale … October [20-23] 1901,” Yale University, 1902
“…the foreign universities’ delegates Marquis Ito…”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Buffalo Courier, Sunday, November 3, 1901
“Marquis Hiroboumi Ito — First citizen of that country which, in the sisterhood of great powers, is next younger than our own, but whose civilization antedates ours by many centuries, — a power which we welcome as an ally in the work of carrying civilization over the world in the century which is just beginning, — we confer upon you the degree of Doctor of Laws and admit you to all its rights and privileges.”
-Excerpt courtesy of, “THE RECORD OF THE CELEBRATION OF THE TWO HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FOUNDING OF YALE COLLEGE, HELD AT YALE UNIVERSITY, IN NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, OCTOBER THE TWENTIETH TO OCTOBER THE TWENTY-THIRD, A. D. NINETEEN HUNDRED AND ONE,” Yale University, 1902. (above) Image courtesy of HathiTrust Digital Collection, Harper’s Weekly, Vol. XLV, No. 2341, November 2, 1901
“…Booker Washington, Ambassador Andrew D. White, straight from Berlin to take in the Yale celebration…
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of HathiTrust Digital Collection, Harper’s Weekly, Vol. XLV, No. 2341, November 2, 1901
“…Ambassador Joseph Choate, who came from London to help Yale celebrate, and other leading personages in the world of letters, art and science.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of HathiTrust Digital Collection, Harper’s Weekly, Vol. XLV, No. 2341, November 2, 1901
“It is only across the way from Yale campus to the Hyperion theatre, where this academic procession headed for, but the immense crowd which blocked practically every foot of space in and around the campus made it almost impossible for the big men to move at more than a snail’s pace.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901 (above) Image courtesy of HathiTrust Digital Collection, Harper’s Weekly, Vol. XLV, No. 2341, November 2, 1901
“About President Roosevelt, as he made his way through this throng, were mounted police, secret service men and local detectives, who had the toughest job of many a day to carry out a passage way for their distinguished charge.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. (above)
Image courtesy of HathiTrust Digital Collection, Harper’s Weekly, Vol. XLV, No. 2341, November 2, 1901
“At the entrance to the theatre it was a solid mass of humanity.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of HathiTrust Digital Collection, Harper’s Weekly, Vol. XLV, No. 2341, November 2, 1901
“Men and women were actually fighting for vantage points from which to get a glimpse of President Roosevelt.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. (above)
Image courtesy of HathiTrust Digital Collection, Harper’s Weekly, Vol. XLV, No. 2341, November 2, 1901
“On Wednesday morning it fell to the lot of the Class to look dejectedly on at the lines of visitors and graduates who marched into the Hyperion theatre for the conferring of degrees. With the faculty went Gregory, the first of the Class to have the honor of an assistant professorship in that body.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “Decennial record of the class of 1896, Yale College,” by Clarence Day, Yale University, 1907.
“The Class stood hopefully in line for upwards of an hour. It cheered the oldest classes as they tottered by, it bantered the middle-aged classes, and finally, impatient at the passing endless chain, broke in upon the swaying line to usurp the place of another class.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “Decennial record of the class of 1896, Yale College,” by Clarence Day, Yale University, 1907.
“The hope of getting into the Hyperion had gone — especially as word was passed along that soldiers were using bayonets at the Vanderbilt Gate, but the desire for a frolic had come and a general scrimmage ensued till collars began to melt, when the members retired to the Fence to take farewell. What does it matter how the official programme ended? With Ninety-Six Bicentennial subsided gently, with sorrow that Twombly’s bass drum was broken, with delight at the celebration, with memories of the past…”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of California Libraries, “Decennial record of the class of 1896, Yale College,” by Clarence Day, Yale University, 1907. (above) Image courtesy of HathiTrust Digital Collections, “The Yale Banner, Volume LX,” by John B. Hart, Lyman S. Spitzer, Yale University, December 1901
“The scene on the stage of the Hyperion theatre, with President Roosevelt as the central figure, surrounded on all sides by the leaders of the intellectual, scientific and political world of the universities, was striking. President Hadley sat in the centre of the stage, President Roosevelt at his right and Governor McLean at his left.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of the Yale Daily News Historical Archive, Yale University, Yale Daily News, Wednesday, October 23, 1901

Commemoration of the Yale Bicentennial at the Hyperion Theatre

“There, stretching away on all sides of President Roosevelt were diplomats, United States senators, Justices of the United States Supreme court, admirals of the United States navy, men prominent in medicine, authors known the world over, representatives of the military department, cabinet officials and presidents of universities.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, The Boston Globe, Wednesday, October 23, 1901
“But at the time these men had taken their seats on the stage there was not a person in the auditorium.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, New-York Tribune, Thursday, October 24, 1901
“There was a tantalizing delay to the Yale officials in the arrangements for admitting the 3,000 people into the theatre. It appeared that the 3,000, particularly the women, tried to get in the one entrance at the same time.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901 (above) Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, The World (New York, New York), Thursday, October 24, 1901
“When the vast audience, among which the women predominated, was finally seated President Hadley stepped to the front of the stage and introduced Edmund Clarence Stedman, of New York, the author and readed of the commemorative poem.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901 (above) Image courtesy of the HathiTrust Digital Library, Princeton University, Yale Alumni Weekly, “The bicentennial: issue of commemoration. An illustrated account of the celebration of the two hundredth anniversary of the founding of Yale … October [20-23] 1901,” Yale University, 1902

Greek Festival Hymn, by Professor Thomas Dwight Goodell, Ph.D., Music by Professor Horatio Parker, A.M.

“The reading of the poem was followed by one of the features of commemoration day and in which Yale scholars took the liveliest interest, the singing of the Greek festival ode composed by Prof. Thomas Goodell, of Yale University, professor of Greek language and literature.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. (above)
Image courtesy of the HathiTrust Digital Library, Princeton University, Yale Alumni Weekly, “The bicentennial: issue of commemoration. An illustrated account of the celebration of the two hundredth anniversary of the founding of Yale … October [20-23] 1901,” Yale University, 1902
“Prof. Horatio W. Parker, of Yale, composed the music. This was sung by a chorus of several hundred Yale students. It was roundly applauded.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of the HathiTrust Digital Collection, The independent v.53, Sept.-Dec. 1901
“Worthless appears the brief span of time
the stern hand of Fate on mortals bestoweth;
Yet by noble and wise benefaction
man to the highest state is exalted…”

-Excerpt and image courtesy of the Internet Archive, Harvard University, “Hymnos Andrōn: Greek Festival Hymn: for Yale University on the Two…”, by Horatio William Parker, Thomas Dwight Goodell, Isabella Grahame Parker, Isabella Grahame (Jennings) Parker, 1901

Yale’s Relation to Public Service, by Justice David Josiah Brewer, LLD.

“Associate Justice Brewer, of the United States Supreme court, then delivered the commemorative address of ‘Yale’s Relation to Public Service. In referring to the attitude of Yale on the questions of public matters and public men, Justice Brewer remarked: ‘I thank God that Yale men can recognize a Washington, though his first name is not George.'”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of HathiTrust Digital Collection, The independent v.53, Sept.-Dec. 1901
“This reference to Booker T. Washington was greeted with great applause.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of HathiTrust Digital Collection, The independent v.53, Sept.-Dec. 1901
“The earth may be dumb, the stars may be silent, but the spirit will fill the vaults of space with songs eternal… Senator Ingalls said of Opportunity —

‘I knock unbidden once at every gate!
If sleeping, wake: if feasting, rise before
I turn away. It is the hour of fate…'”


To-day the great temple of popular government in this Republic rises before the world the most magnificent structure on the political horizon. Her foundations rest on rocks more solid than New England granite; her architecture filled with a beauty richer than can be found in all the luxuriant growth of southern foliage and flower, and gilded with a shining splendor surpassing aught ever seen in California’s golden sands; and in and upon all that lofty structure, from lowest wall to highest spire, Yale has written these immortal words: ‘I train for public service.'”
-Excerpt courtesy of, “THE RECORD OF THE CELEBRATION OF THE TWO HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FOUNDING OF YALE COLLEGE, HELD AT YALE UNIVERSITY, IN NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, OCTOBER THE TWENTIETH TO OCTOBER THE TWENTY-THIRD, A. D. NINETEEN HUNDRED AND ONE,” “Yale’s Relation to Public Service, by David Josiah Brewer,” Yale University, 1902. (above)

Conferring of Honorary Degrees on President Roosevelt and Others

“Then came the presentation of the honorary degrees. Every name read was cheered. This was particularly so when Mark Twain’s name was mentioned.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of the HathiTrust Digital Collection, “The World To-day, Volume 1, Issue 1,” 1901
“He was upon the stage at the time and looked delighted at this recognition by a New Haven audience for a former Hartford man.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Boston Globe, Monday, October 14, 1901
“The interesting event in the presentation of honorary degrees was held for the last and this was the presentation of the degree to President Roosevelt. When the other candidates had received their marks of distinction, President Hadley, in a lull of the cheering, said: ‘One name yet remains.’ He hardly had uttered these words, when delegates, guests and graduates rose in a body and cheered.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Boston Globe, Wednesday, October 23, 1901
“At the next pause Mr. Hadley continued: ‘To Theodore Roosevelt, while he was yet a private citizen, we offered the degree of doctor of laws on account of his achievements in letters, history and public service.’ Then the audience broke out again with tumultuous cheering. ‘Since in his providence,’ continued President Hadley, ‘it pleases God to give him another title, we give him a double measure. President Roosevelt is a Harvard, (the mention of Harvard was cheered,) but his broad vision and natural sympathy, and his perseverance for truth and right, will make him glad to be an adopted son of Yale.'”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Leader-Democrat (Springfield, Missouri,) Wednesday, October 23, 1901
“In response to this introduction President Roosevelt rose from his seat and was greeted with louder cheers than before. When in turn the president of the United States had received his degree from the hand of President Hadley the crowd arose again and called for a speech. President Roosevelt in response, took a few steps toward the front of the stage and said:”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Boston Globe, Wednesday, October 23, 1901
“I have never yet worked at a task worth doing, that I did not find myself working shoulder to shoulder with some son of Yale. I have never yet been in any struggle for righteousness or decency, that there were not men of Yale to aid me and give me strength and courage.

As we walked hither this morning we passed by a gateway raised in memory of a young Yale lad who was hurt to death beside me, when he and I and many others like us marched against the hammering guns that smote us from the heights; and with those memories quick in my mind, I thank you from my heart for the honor you do me, and I thank you doubly because you planned to do me that honor while I was yet a private citizen.”
-Excerpt courtesy of, “THE RECORD OF THE CELEBRATION OF THE TWO HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FOUNDING OF YALE COLLEGE, HELD AT YALE UNIVERSITY, IN NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, OCTOBER THE TWENTIETH TO OCTOBER THE TWENTY-THIRD, A. D. NINETEEN HUNDRED AND ONE,” Yale University, 1902. (above) Image courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Poultney Journal (Poultney, Vermont), Friday, September 20, 1901
“After exercises in the Hyperion as many of the audience as could crowded to the stage to shake hands with President Roosevelt. Mark Twain came in for a big share of attention as he left the theatre. President Roosevelt was driven to the residence of William W. Farnam on Prospect Hill, where he was entertained while he remained in New Haven.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Boston Globe, Thursday, October 24, 1901
“In the evening the president and his party were driven to the new Yale bi-centennial dining hall where he held a reception for one hour. After this social function the president returned to the Farnam residence. A dinner was given in his honor during the evening at which about forty persons were present upon invitation of Prof. and Mrs. Farnam.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of HathiTrust Digital Collection, Harper’s Weekly, Vol. XLV, No. 2341, November 2, 1901

Dedication of Woodbridge Hall, by the Revered Theodore Thornton Munger, D.D.

O thou who are from everlasting to everlasting; who changest not with the changing years, but are art forever the same — of infinite power, and wisdom, and goodness; our God and the God of our fathers. We adore thee, we bless thee, we praise thee and rejoice in thee forever.

Especially in these days of glad commemoration do we lift our hearts to thee, and render thanks for the mercy and goodness with which thou hast led this University from its feeble beginnings up to the present hour of strength and prosperity… when the guardians of this ancient institution shall assemble here, may they be imbued with the spirit of a sound mind, with far-reaching wisdom — not forgetting the past nor unmindful of the future…”
-Excerpt courtesy of, “THE RECORD OF THE CELEBRATION OF THE TWO HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FOUNDING OF YALE COLLEGE, HELD AT YALE UNIVERSITY, IN NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, OCTOBER THE TWENTIETH TO OCTOBER THE TWENTY-THIRD, A. D. NINETEEN HUNDRED AND ONE,” Yale University, 1902. (above) Image courtesy of the Internet Archive, Princeton Theological Seminary Library, “Theodore Thornton Munger: New England Minister,” by Benjamin Wisner Bacon, 1913
“The closing exercises of Yale’s bicentennial came this afternoon when Woodbridge hall, one of the new bi-centennial buildings, known as the administration building and presented to Yale by the Misses Stokes of New York city, was dedicated. They are the aunts of the Rev. Anson Phelps Stokes, secretary to the Yale corporation.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of HathiTrust Digital Collection, Harper’s Weekly, Vol. XLV, No. 2341, November 2, 1901
“The dedicatory address was delivered by Donald G. Mitchell of this city, known in the world of letters as Ik Marvel.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Scranton Republican, Thursday Morning, October 24, 1901. (above) Image courtesy of HathiTrust Digital Collection, The independent v.53, Sept.-Dec. 1901
“Woodbridge Hall was completed for Yale’s bicentennial in 1901 by the gift of Olivia Egleston Phelps Stokes and Caroline Phelps Stokes and named for Rev. Timothy Woodbridge, one of the founders of Yale College. The heart of the ‘power center of the university,’ it houses the Office of the President, the Office of the Secretary, and the Corporation Room.”
-Excerpt and image courtesy of Yale University, Visitor Center, Tours, Women at Yale, “Woodbridge Hall,” 2019
-Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Chronicling America, The Minneapolis Journal, Thursday Evening, October 24, 1901
-Image courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Des Moines Register (Des Moines, Iowa), Sunday, February 28, 1904
“Students leaving Battell Chapel, Yale University, New Haven, Conn.” -Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Detroit Publishing Company photograph collection, between 1900 and 1915
-Image is an amalgamation, courtesy of Harvard University Library, Theodore Roosevelt Collection, Yale Alumni Weekly, Yale University, 1901

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