The Warner, Student Apartments, 1044 Chapel Street, New Haven, Conn.

“The Currier & Ives lithograph shows people fleeing across the Randolph Street Bridge. Thousands of people literally ran for their lives before the flames, unleashing remarkable scenes of terror and dislocation. ‘The whole earth, or all we saw of it, was a lurid yellowish red,’ wrote one survivor. ‘Everywhere dust, smoke, flames, heat, thunder of falling walls, crackle of fire, hissing of water, panting of engines, shouts, braying of trumpets, roar of wind, confusion, and uproar.'” -Image courtesy of Wikipedia, Chicago Historical Society, “Chicago in Flames,” lithography by Currier & Ives, 1871

“Henry A., son of Gaius Fenn Warner, was born March 10, 1842, at Waterville, in the town of Waterbury, and was six years old when the family settled in New Haven. There, in the public and private schools, and at General Russell’s and Hopkins grammar school, he received his education, and was prepared for a business career. For years he was an iron manufacturer, continuing his father’s large concern, and he has dealt in pipe, in which line his efforts met with deserved success. Returning east after the Chicago fire, Mr. Warner rested at Akron, Ohio, and found a make of pipe which had not been introduced east, where imported Scotch pipe and a slip glaze pipe from New Jersey were in use. However, they were soon superseded by the Ohio pipe, which Mr. Warner introduced and sold throughout New England. For many years he received royalty on all pipes made from this clay and sold east. He has also dealt extensively in real estate, and is proprietor of the Warner Hall Apartment Hotel, at No. 1044 Chapel street, New Haven. At the time of the erection of this building, which was the first six-story building erected in Connecticut, he gave it the name of ‘Warner Hall,’ quite unaware that there had been a ‘Warner Hall’ at the Manor of Pakelsham, which was granted to John Warner of ‘Warner Hall’ in Great Waltham, England. Mr. Warner resides at 612 Whitney avenue, New Haven, Connecticut.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Google Books, “New England Families, Genealogical and Memorial: A Record of the Achievements of Her People in the Making of Commonwealths and the Founding of a Nation, Volume 4,” by William Richard Cutter, 1913. (top) “Looking at the south side of Chapel Street between High and College Streets. Warner Hall served as a dormitory for Yale Students and it is still standing at 1040 Chapel Street. Just to the left of Warner Hall is the alley that led to the Hyperion Theatre. To the left of the alley is the Sherman Building, home of the Union League Club.” Image courtesy of the CT State Library, Randall Photographic Survey of New Haven and Environs, “Warner Hall,” by Herbert Randall, c. 1880-1920

-Image courtesy of the Internet Archive, Public Domain Mark 1.0, “1875 New Haven CT Directory Connecticut,” by J H Benham, 1875

“Beach Burwell has built… a house for Gaius F. Warner in Chapel street, now occupied by the Republican League.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, The Library of Congress, “History of the city of New Haven to the present time,” by Edward E. Atwater, 1887

-Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut, Sanborn Map Company, 188

BUILDING NOTES. — A Fine Winter for Builders and Employees.

“Work on the H. A. Warner hall and building next the Hyperion is being pushed forward rapidly. This open winter has been a very satisfactory one to builders and their employees. It beats all the records, so old masons say, who aver that never in the memory of the oldest one of the craft in town has less time been lost on account of cold days than this winter. Last Friday and Saturday the masons at work at Warner hall ‘knocked off’ work, the weather being too cold to permit of first class mason work being done. This was about the old time lost this winter through cold weather. When the mercury gets down to 20 degrees or lower, the masons quit work, as satisfactory mason work is hardly ever done with the temperature down below 20 degrees.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, New Haven Daily Morning Journal and Courier, Tuesday, February 25, 1890

-Image courtesy of Hyperion New Haven collection, 2019

WARNER HALL COMPLETED.

Complete Description of This New and Beautiful Hall — Built on Historical Grounds.

“Notwithstanding the strikes and various unforeseen obstacles, the opening day at Warner hall finally arrived last evening and New Haven can congratulate herself on possessing one of the finest, most completely furnished and most unique amusement halls in the country. Ground for the edifice was broken in January last and the work progressed steadily during the mild winter and early spring. The corner stone was laid on March 10th. In the copper box which was placed inside the stone were copies of the city press, a city directory and various historical papers and coins. The building covers the rear of the lot adjoining the Hyperion and opposite Yale university and is 40 feet by 110 feet in size and two stories in height. The material of which the building is built is pallet brick and East Haven rock stone. The contractors were George M. Grant for the mason work and McQueen and Smith for carpenter and joiner work. The plumbing work was done by Buckley and Rourke Bro’s, steam heating by the New Haven Steam Heating company and the painting by B. F. Brockett.

The first floor is devoted to restaurant purposes, with two large kitchens, pantries and storerooms. The kitchen has Branhall & Dean hotel ranges, and hard coal and charcoal broilers. Dumb waiters extend from the kitchen and dining room to the banquet hall and gallery above. The dining room is finished in white and gold; has large French plate mirrors and mantel with open fireplace and tables to seat 150 persons. Several private dining rooms also open from the main dining room. The basement is devoted to storage purposes. Ample flights of stairs from each end and side lead to the assembly room above, which is capable of seating some seven hundred persons. The hall proper is 90 by 37 feet and 20 feet in height, with gallery over the entrance and ticket office 37 by 15 feet. At the opposite end is the stage, 17 feet square, between four dressing rooms, each of which is 9 by 18 feet, and a musicians’ gallery 5 by 17 feet.

The hall is amply lighted on all sides by large windows, with upper rows of diamond-shaped windows of Venetian glass which open on pivots for ventilation. The wood work is all of the finest quartered oak, finished in natural color, with dressing rooms of ash with antique finish. The ceiling is of ash with large timbers forming panels twelve feet square, from which depend three of Frink’s reflectors, and the side walls also have double-armed gas brackets. Incandescent electric lights will also be used for lighting purposes.

The floor has been made in the most approved manner, with two lining floors and four layers of deafening paper, the upper floor being made of 1 1/4 inch maple of narrow lengths, planed smooth, filled and finished for dancing purposes. On the west side of the hall, at the center, is an immense quartered oak mantel of elaborate and novel design, specially gotten up by Architect Brown and made and put up by James Scott of this city, who did most of the carved work at the Waddingham mansion. The mantel is about eighteen feet wide and the same in height; has upholstered settees at each side, while eight-inch columns twelve feet in height support the massive colonial top. Between the columns are two bevelled glass mirrors, each over seven feet long. Below the mirrors is a large open fireplace encased in Tennessee marble, while heavy bronze andirons support a gas log, which gives a cheerful appearance to the hall. The dressing rooms are handsomely fitted with carpets and rugs.

The plumbing and toilet accommodations are complete and finished in the most complete sanitary manner. The stage curtain is from the New Haven Window Shade Co. and the portieres from Crampton & Heaton. The floor of the hall is seated with cane seat and new specially designed folding chairs. The building has been erected by Mr. Henry A. Warner at a cost of over $20,000 and is erected on a portion of his late father’s homestead, and what was also of somewhat historical grounds, having been Washington’s headquarters in this city, and contained the oldest house of revolutionary times. The entire premises have been leased by Mrs. E. A. Redcliffe for a term of years, who with her son, F. J. Redcliffe, will carry on a first-class restaurant on the first floor, and rent the hall for banquets, assemblies, etc.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, New Haven Daily Morning Journal and Courier, Thursday, October 9, 1890

-Image courtesy of the HathiTrust Digital Library, Yale University, “The Yale Literary Magazine, Volume 56,” Herrick & Noyes, 1891

“HENRY A. WARNER, New Haven: Iron Manufacturer and Sewer Pipe Dealer… educated in the private and public schools of New Haven, where he has lived since he was six years of age. He was formerly an iron manufacturer and is now a dealer in drain and sewer pipe. He resides on Orange street in New Haven and is also the proprietor of Warner Hall on Chapel street. Mr. Warner has served in the second company of Governor’s Horse Guard and is a member of the New Haven Republican League. He is a member of the College Street Congregational church in New Haven. He has not held public office. Mr. Warner is married, his wife being Miss Gertrude E. Morton. They have no children.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of Connecticut Libraries, “Illustrated popular biography of Connecticut,” by John Augustus Spalding, 1891

“H. A. Warner.” -Image courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of Connecticut Libraries, “Illustrated popular biography of Connecticut,” by John Augustus Spalding, 1891

“Henry A. Warner was on the ground yesterday giving directions preparatory to the beginning of the work of building the cellar of his new hotel on Chapel street, in front of Warner hall. Architect Russell has changed the plans so as to make the building six stories high instead of five. Ground was broken yesterday for the new structure.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, New Haven Daily Morning Journal and Courier, Saturday, September 24, 1892

AN INTERESTING DISCOVERY.

An Old Well Found in Front of Warner Hall, Supposed to Date Back to Puritan Times.

“While the workmen were digging yesterday for the cellar of the new building which is to be erected by Mr. Warner in front of Warner hall for an extension of the Warner hall building, they came upon, ten feet below the surface, an ancient well which is thought to date back to the time of the Puritans. It is on the site of the old Roger Sherman house, which was one of the oldest in New Haven and which was pulled down in 1860. The Messrs. White and Horace Day were consulted, but none remembered having heard of such a well. It is about fifteen feet deep and is built of East Haven red sandstone very neatly laid, and is in an excellent state of preservation. It is one of the most interesting discoveries that has recently been made in this city, as it is rare that such a relic of Puritan times is found.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, New Haven Daily Morning Journal and Courier, Wednesday, October 19, 1892

-Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Maps, “A plan of the town of New Haven: with all the buildings in 1748 taken by the Hon. Gen. Wadsworth of Durham to which are added the names and professions of the inhabitants at that period: also the location of lots to many of the first grantees,” by William Lyon, Thomas Kensett, James Wadsworth, Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences. 1806
-Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Maps, “A plan of the town of New Haven: with all the buildings in 1748 taken by the Hon. Gen. Wadsworth of Durham to which are added the names and professions of the inhabitants at that period: also the location of lots to many of the first grantees,” by William Lyon, Thomas Kensett, James Wadsworth, Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences. 1806

THAT ANCIENT WELL — Which was Unearthed in Front of Warner Hall — It was Just in the Wrong Place for the Present Improvement — How a Solid Foundation Has Been Secured.

“The contractors, Bates & Townsend, who are building the new extension of Warner hall, would have been better pleased if the Puritans, or whoever made that ancient well, referred to in the Courier a few days since, had put it in a different place, as it is causing a deal of labor and engineering skill to be sure of a firm foundation for the piers, which are to carry the stone arch and front walls. Mr. Russell, the architect, as in part adopted the Chicago style of iron cob work, putting in tons of sixteen foot rails of railroad iron crossed by others with the division walls all bedded in Portland cement. Below these is concrete two feet thick and five feet wide, and above them are two heavy inverted arches surmounted with a flat stone four feet square and a foot thick upon which stands the stone pier to carry the walls.

‘The Warner’ is to be one of the most substantial buildings, with massive walls, into which will go over half a million brick, ten tons of steel girders and many tons of East Haven stone. The timbers are all heavy southern pine. There will be over seventy rooms fitted up in hard woods, and all the modern improvements, electric elevator, etc. Stores on fruit [sic] floor and on the seconded added conveniences to the hall, while the other stories will be devoted to suites of departments. [sic]”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, New Haven Daily Morning Journal and Courier, Friday, October 28, 1892

“Architect’s Original Rendering of The Warner.” -Image courtesy of the New Haven Building Archive, Yale University, “1044 Chapel Street, The Warner, by architect Rufus G. Russell,” researched by Davis Butner, February 2018
“Original Floor Plans of The Warner.” -Image courtesy of the New Haven Building Archive, Yale University, “1044 Chapel Street, The Warner, by architect Rufus G. Russell,” researched by Davis Butner, February 2018
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, New Haven Daily Morning Journal and Courier, Saturday, January 28, 1893

AT WARNER HALL. — Views of the Great World’s Fair Buildings at Chicago.

“A foretaste of the greatness of the Chicago exhibition will be given at Warner hall Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday evenings of next week under the management of J. P. Dibble. So many romancing tales of the immensity of the fair have been started that a feeling of doubt as to where fact left off and fancy began has been in many minds. These fine views, however, direct from the originals, will place it beyond a doubt that the show is as large as it is painted. The buildings appear to be even more substantial and extensive than all accounts have made them, and there is no doubt that the world’s fair will really be ‘the greatest show on earth.'”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, New Haven Daily Morning Journal and Courier, Saturday, January 28, 1893

-Image courtesy of Yale University, Historical New Haven Digital Collection, “Chicago World Colombian Exposition,” 1893

BUILDING NOTES. — The New Six-Story Building on Chapel Street

“Although New Haven has about 100,000 inhabitants, a six-story building is quite a novelty here. The Chicago ‘sky scrapers’ are heard of the world over, and have aroused our conservative real estate proprietors, and several new structures in modern style are contemplated. Mr. H. Warner’s new six-story building next the Republican League is attracting much attention. It has now reached its sixth story, and the fine design of the structure begins to show forth, so that he who runs may read. This building is both tall and stately, and is likewise handsome, and is highly creditable to Mr. W. and to the city. It will no doubt prove a good investment also, situated as it is opposite Yale’s campus.

The interior finish and equipment is to be very fine and complete in every way, with the use of hard woods, marble wainscotings, iron stair warp, electric light, steam heat and open fires, together with perfect sanitary work, with needle shower and porcelain bath tubs, etc. The attractive Warner hall will now have a front entrance, and also a large parlor with other ante-rooms. On the third floor will be a complete billiard and reading room for free use of tenant, and in case of need it can be used in connection with the gallery of the hall for banquets, etc., when the floor of the hall is wanted for dancing. A large amount of money has been put into the place, which gives our city a very fine place for social gatherings.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, New Haven Daily Morning Journal and Courier, Thursday, March 9, 1893

Warner Hall Entrance

“Since completion of the new front building, the center store connects directly with hall and restaurant; also has elevator for the apartments, and for convenience of all an automatic telephone has just been put in.

Patrons of the hall do not now have to use driveway, but enter center doors directly from front walk at 1044 Chapel street.”
-Except courtesy of Newspapers.com, New Haven Daily Morning Journal and Courier, Friday, December 29, 1893

-Image courtesy of the Yale Daily News Historical Archive, Yale Daily News, no. A, June 29, 1894
-Image courtesy of the HathiTrust Digital Library, Yale University, The Yale Banner, V. 54, 1895
-Image courtesy of the HathiTrust Digital Library, Public Domain, Google-digitized, “Pot pourri. v.8,” 1900

“The late nineteenth century did not just bring theaters to the downtown; it also brought a change in the way that people lived and how the buildings were used. Yale was rapidly expanding and the need for student housing resulted in the construction of Warner Hall in 1892 at 1044 Chapel Street and the Hotel Majestic in 1894 at 1151 Chapel Street, both near the Yale campus. These two highly significant private dormitories remain almost entirely intact and because few communities in the state faced the same needs for housing numerous students during this period, they are an unusual adjunct to the usual downtown core. The quality of their design reflects the amenities they offered in their heyday, and the tastes of the people who lived there. The construction of these private dormitories foreshadowed the popularity of the apartment house during the early twentieth century. Many people moved to the suburbs during this period, but a staunch core of industrialists and Yale professors continued to live within the district.”
-Excerpt courtesy of NHPT: The New Haven Preservation Trust, National Register Historic District, Chapel Street

“Looking north across Chapel Street at the Duncan Hotel which is located at 1151 Chapel Street.” -Image courtesy of the CT State Library, Randall Photographic Survey of New Haven and Environs, “Duncan Hotel,” by Herbert Randall, c. 1880-1920

“Mr. Rufus G. Russell, architect, of New Haven, New England, died on August 3, at the age of 73, having passed 30 years of his life in the practice of his profession in that quiet collegiate town. Besides the many houses, churches and other buildings which Mr. Russell designed for New Haven, he also planned and built the Garfield Memorial Church at Washington, D.C.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, “The Building News and Engineering Journal,” September 4, 1896

-Image courtesy of the Yale Daily News Historical Archive, Yale Daily News, no. Extra, June 30, 1897
“‘Warner Hall’ in 1897.” -Image courtesy of the New Haven Building Archive, Yale University, “1044 Chapel Street, The Warner, by architect Rufus G. Russell,” researched by Davis Butner, February 2018

Student demand: the effect of Yale, by Emily Liu

“Several early apartments were built specifically with accommodating a student population in mind. Just as young well-to-do men occupied the earliest high-end apartment buildings of New York City [upon completion of the Stuyvesant Building (arguably the first New York apartment house) in 1870, the architect Hunt and owner Stuyvesant attracted tenants to this ‘radically new type of home… by filling the house with his Knickerbocker friends and successful writers and artists’] the young men at Yale would contribute to the development of apartments in New Haven. While many students lived off-campus, the trend became increasingly common under the presidency of Timothy Dwight V (1887–1899) as student population grew significantly and outpaced campus housing supply. By the turn of the century most undergraduates, particularly the wealthier, did not live on campus. This population was young, without family, affluent and in the short-term rental market — a perfect renter pool for high-end multiple dwellings. Many early apartment builders seized upon this market and created several notable structures on streets directly surrounding the college campus.

In the early 1890s, Henry A. Warner constructed ‘The Warner’ at 1042-1046 Chapel Street, directly across the street from Yale’s Old Campus, making it one of the earliest buildings in this study. Henry was the well-to-do son of Gaius Fenn Warner, who built and occupied the property directly adjacent at 1032 Chapel (now Union League Cafe). Like his New York City counterparts, Henry filled his apartment house with a young population, creating ‘one of the first of the large private dormitories to be occupied by Yale men.’ The luxury building featured all the modern conveniences including one of the earliest residential-use elevators in the city and advertised itself as ‘Fine Apartments for Families and Bachelors’.  The building was divided into two types of units, ‘The Warner Apartments,’ which provided housing ‘For Yale Students’ ‘From $3 to $15 per week,’ which included ‘heat, light, and attendance,’ and ‘Warner Hall’ apartments, which were rented out on a daily or weekly basis to non-students. The building also boasted a restaurant and a dance hall which reportedly ‘has been the scene of many social gatherings.’ While ‘abandoned by Yale lodgers’ following University housing requirements, the Warner continued to provide family apartment rentals.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Yale Law School, Yale Law School Legal Scholarship Repository, “The Creation of Urban Homes: Apartment Buildings in New Haven, 1890 – 1930,” by Emily Liu, 2006

-Image courtesy of the HathiTrust Digital Library, Public Domain, Google-digitized, “Price & Lee’s New Haven (New Haven County, Conn.),” 1900

A CHANGE AT WARNER HALL — To Be Altered Into a Pool and Billiard Room.

“Warner Hall for several years known as one of the most popular halls in the city for entertainments and dances, is now about to be changed for business purposes. The owner of the building, Henry A. Warner, spent about $20,000 in erecting the addition to provide room for the hall and in fitting up the hall. It has been largely used during the past ten years, but now so many halls have been built that during the last few years it has not proved profitable. It has been leased by Beardsley & Eggleston, who will in a few days open it as a first class pool and billiard room.

It will be a temperance place and will be equipped with fifteen tables. The hall is opposite the campus, and well known to students and it is thought that the new enterprise will prove successful.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, New Haven Daily Morning Journal and Courier, Saturday, September 22, 1900

-Image courtesy of the HathiTrust Digital Library, Yale University, The Yale Banner, v. 59, 1900
-Image courtesy of the Yale Daily News Historical Archive, Yale Daily News, no. 109, February 20, 1902
-Image courtesy of the Yale Daily News Historical Archive, Yale Daily News, no. 109, February 20, 1902
-Image courtesy of the Yale Daily News Historical Archive, Yale Daily News, no. 109, February 20, 1902

ISIDORE WISE BUYS NEW HAVEN PROPERTY — Said to Have Paid $125,000 for Warner Hall Building.

“An important real estate transaction was completed in New Haven yesterday, in which Hartford is interested, when I. Wise, of Wise, Smith & Co. of this city, bought the Warner Hall property on Chapel street, opposite Vanderbilt Hall, from the Warner estate. The property runs back 194 feet and includes a mutual gangway leading to the carriage entrance to the Hyperion Theater and to the Hyperion stables. The building has sixty-six rooms, and on the main floor two stores and a restaurant. It is on the grand list of New Haven for $90,000 and a New Haven paper says it is understood that the price paid by Mr. Wise was $125,000.

Mr. Wise when asked about the sale yesterday afternoon said he had bought the property, but that he did not care, at the present time, to say what he intended to do with it. The building, which is a seven-story brick and stone structure, is located within a few doors of the new Taft Hotel, and is in a rapidly appreciating section of New Haven’s main business thoroughfare.

It was built in the early 90’s by the late Henry A. Warner of New Haven and was one of the first of the large private dormitories to be occupied by Yale men. When the university required undergraduates to room on the campus, Warner Hall was abandoned by Yale lodgers and for several years it has been occupied as family apartments. The building contains a large assembly hall, which has been the scene of many social gatherings. A number of societies have held their meetings there in the past.”
-Excerpt courtesy of Newspapers.com, The Hartford Courant, Thursday, December 4, 1913

“1913 Advertisement for Change in Ownership of ‘The Warner'” -Image courtesy of the New Haven Building Archive, Yale University, “1044 Chapel Street, The Warner, by architect Rufus G. Russell,” researched by Davis Butner, February 2018
-Image courtesy of the Pennsylvania State Archives, World War I Posters (PA), “‘Gee!! I Wish I Were a Man, I’d Join the Navy,’ 1044 Chapel Street, New Haven,” contributed by Howard Chandler Christy, 1917
-Image courtesy of the Hoover Institution Library & Archives, Stanford University, Poster collection, “Speed means safety for our ships. The U. S. Navy’s need is 7,000 firemen now. Be a speedmaker. Apply at Navy recruiting station, 1044 Chapel St.,” by the United States Navy Recruiting Command, 1917 / 1918
-Image courtesy of the Yale Daily News Historical Archive, Yale Daily News, no. 55, November 21, 1950
“1044 Chapel St. (1892) Warner Hall. 6-story brick Queen Anne commerical/residential building designed by Rufus G. Russell. 3 bays wide with 2 storefronts flanking a central entrance.” -Image courtesy of the National Register of Historic Places, Chapel Street Commercial Historic District, Photograph by Kate Ohno, 1982
“THE WARNER (1042-1046 CHAPEL). Photograph taken Spring 2007 by author.” -Image courtesy of Yale Law School, Yale Law School Legal Scholarship Repository, “The Creation of Urban Homes: Apartment Buildings in New Haven, 1890 – 1930,” by Emily Liu, 2007
-Image courtesy of Wikipedia, Historic districts in New Haven, Connecticut, Chapel Street Historic District, “Warner Hall (1892), 1044 Chapel St., Rufus G. Russell,” Wikimedia Foundation, 2010

Elm Campus Partners: 1044 Chapel Street – The Warner

“The Warner is one of New Haven’s classic landmark buildings, perched above the shops on Sherman’s Alley and adjacent to the esteemed Union League Café. Constructed in 1892, the building retains much of its nineteenth century charm, including period details and bay windows. It is one of Rufus G. Russell’s last designs, calling forth the Romanesque Revival style. This building was commissioned by Henry A. Warner and was original used as a private dormitory for Yale University students. The Warner building was one of the first buildings designed as an apartment house in the city. Rental prices include all utilities. The 5 studio apartments lease from $785 to $1,080, the 12 one-bedroom apartments will rent for $1,155 to $1,340, 1 two-bedroom apartment will be available for $1,700, 3 three-bedrooms will be offered from $2,525 to $2,755, and 1 four-bedroom will rent for $3,340. Building features include an elevator servicing all seven floors, and there is a laundry room on the second floor for our tenants. This Chapel District building is convenient to the Art and Architecture Building, the Medical School, and Yale’s central campus. Heat, hot water, and electricity are included in the rental prices.”
-Excerpt courtesy of the Internet Archive, ElmCampus.com, “Elm Campus Partners — 1044 Chapel,” July 22, 2012

THE WARNERS OF ENGLAND

“Several explanations have been suggested as to the origin of the name ‘Warner’. It was used in England in early times as a personal name and occurs in the Domesday Book. In the reign of Henry III of England, mention is made of ‘Henri le Warn’, and in 1302 the annals of Crokerdon Abbey contain the name of ‘Ythel le Warner’. An early English record speaks of ‘Jacke le Warner’, and Langland, the poet, writes of ‘Watte the Warner’. Some authorities give the derivation from Wern, in the sense of nationality, combined with Hari, warrior, making the Old High German form Warender, from which come the English Warner and Warener, meaning hero-warrior…

The most noted of the Essex family was Edmund Warner, Esq., who had an estate as early as 1360 in the eastern part of Essex County between Great Waltham and Dunmow, known as ‘Warner Hall’ or ‘Warner Manor’…
-Excerpt courtesy of the HathiTrust Digital Library, Public Domain, “The descendants of Andrew Warner,” compiled by Lucien C. Warner

-Image courtesy of the HathiTrust Digital Library, Public Domain, “The descendants of Andrew Warner,” compiled by Lucien C. Warner

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