Booker T. Washington, A Guest of Honor

"Roosevelt looked calm and purposeful as he traveled through Connecticut on 23 October. The Secret Service, however, was noticeably apprehensive when he reached the Yale campus. In view of what had happened the last time a President had accepted public handshakes, he was forbidden to work the crowd. Shocked by this restriction, Roosevelt seemed to realize his personal and political danger for the first time. He averted his eyes from Washington during their march to Hyperion Theater. A revised security plan seated them far apart, with the Negro in the audience and Roosevelt himself on the stage. No reference to their dinner was made during the ensuing speeches. But cheers filled the hall when Supreme Court Justice David J. Brewer invoked the Father of the Nation and remarked, 'Thank God, there have always been in this country college men able to recognize a true Washington, though his first name be not George.'"

The Celebration of the Two Hundredth Anniversary of the Founding of Yale College, Held at Yale University, in New Haven, Connecticut, October the Twentieth to October the Twenty-Third, A. D. Nineteen Hundred and One

"President Theodore Roosevelt, who was the chief figure of the closing day of Yale's bicentennial celebrations, given an ovation as he receives his honorary degree. He pays a tribute to the sons of old Eli. 'I have never yet worked at a task worth doing that I did not find myself shoulder to shoulder with some son of Yale.'"

The Gown Laid Aside

"New Haven was never a boom town. It developed slowly, it grew steadily, not spasmodically. Conservatism became characteristic of it. Conservative it has remained until now. All though the nineteenth century, while steadily growing in strength and substance, it never outwardly startled the beholder. Those who really knew the city came to love it for its 'parts' rather than for ostentatious prosperity. It was a city of traditions and history, a city content to have intensive rather than extensive growth was the New Haven which woke on the mourn of its 264th year when it celebrated with Yale the completed two centuries."

Samuel Langhorne Clemens, Doctor of Letters

"Now then, to me university degrees are unearned finds, and they bring the joy that belongs with property acquired in that way... It pleased me beyond measure when Yale made me a Master of Arts, because I didn't know anything about art; I had another convulsion of pleasure when Yale made me a Doctor of Literature, because I was not competent to doctor anybody's literature but my own, and couldn't even keep my own in a healthy condition without my wife's help."

RODE ON A HANDCAR.

"New Haven was reached after the greatest handcar race on record. The big, brawny Irishmen worked the cranks like majors, and they got the $200 too. Miss Anderson said it was the most exciting ride she had ever experienced in all her travels around both hemispheres on all sorts of trains and vehicles."

A Connecticut Yankee at Yale, by Wilbur L. Cross

"I had but to walk over to Carll’s Opera House, where in one season or another I might see the great contemporary actors: Booth and Barrett, Irving and Terry, Modjeska or Bernhardt, or Joe Jefferson (a favorite of the students). It may have been in New York that I first saw the elder Salvini in the role of Othello. Was it then or later that Gilbert and Sullivan’s operas came to town? I thank God that the visual age was in the far distance when novels and plays were to be washed out with pictures on a screen."

MEMORIES OF A PLEASANT EVENING

"A great many people like to keep their program as a souvenir or reminder of a particularly enjoyable evening. Here is a space to jot a few little aids to pleasant memories of... MR. S. Z. POLI Presents THE HYPERION PLAYERS -IN- 'TRILBY' By George Du Maurier, Under the Direction of Bernard Steele, Ast. Director, Jerome Broderick."