Latest Posts

The Warner, Student Apartments, 1044 Chapel Street, New Haven, Conn.

"Although New Haven has about 100,000 inhabitants, a six-story building is quite a novelty here. The Chicago 'sky scrapers' are heard of the world over, and have aroused our conservative real estate proprietors, and several new structures in modern style are contemplated. Mr. H. Warner's new six-story building next to the Republican League is attracting much attention."

The Yale record: 1701 – 1901

"Bicentennial Notes: Souvenirs are for graduates only. To avoid others taking them, there will be no souvenirs. The animals will be fed at the University Dining Hall three times daily. Come and see them. They eat raw meet. No one but graduates are allowed to climb on the decorations or statues."

Booker T. Washington, A Guest of Honor

"Roosevelt looked calm and purposeful as he traveled through Connecticut on 23 October. The Secret Service, however, was noticeably apprehensive when he reached the Yale campus. In view of what had happened the last time a President had accepted public handshakes, he was forbidden to work the crowd. Shocked by this restriction, Roosevelt seemed to realize his personal and political danger for the first time. He averted his eyes from Washington during their march to Hyperion Theater. A revised security plan seated them far apart, with the Negro in the audience and Roosevelt himself on the stage. No reference to their dinner was made during the ensuing speeches. But cheers filled the hall when Supreme Court Justice David J. Brewer invoked the Father of the Nation and remarked, 'Thank God, there have always been in this country college men able to recognize a true Washington, though his first name be not George.'"

The Celebration of the Two Hundredth Anniversary of the Founding of Yale College, Held at Yale University, in New Haven, Connecticut, October the Twentieth to October the Twenty-Third, A. D. Nineteen Hundred and One

"President Theodore Roosevelt, who was the chief figure of the closing day of Yale's bicentennial celebrations, given an ovation as he receives his honorary degree. He pays a tribute to the sons of old Eli. 'I have never yet worked at a task worth doing that I did not find myself shoulder to shoulder with some son of Yale.'"

YALE DECORATIONS. FESTOONS OF BUNTING, IMPORTED LANTERNS.

"The general effect of this decoration will be of two lines of festoons from Phelps hall, which will be the main entrance to the campus during the bi-centennial, extending to Osborn Hall on the south and Battell Chapel on the north. The electrical illumination will be concentrated at Phelps Hall, about 700 electric lights outlining the horizontal and vertical lines of the building. A Union Jack, with 45 stars on a blue background, will surmount the battlements of the building. Across its front will be stretched an emblematic shield, eight by twelve feet in dimensions, its frame work decorated with flags and streamers."

The Gown Laid Aside

"New Haven was never a boom town. It developed slowly, it grew steadily, not spasmodically. Conservatism became characteristic of it. Conservative it has remained until now. All though the nineteenth century, while steadily growing in strength and substance, it never outwardly startled the beholder. Those who really knew the city came to love it for its 'parts' rather than for ostentatious prosperity. It was a city of traditions and history, a city content to have intensive rather than extensive growth was the New Haven which woke on the mourn of its 264th year when it celebrated with Yale the completed two centuries."

Samuel Langhorne Clemens, Doctor of Letters

"Now then, to me university degrees are unearned finds, and they bring the joy that belongs with property acquired in that way... It pleased me beyond measure when Yale made me a Master of Arts, because I didn't know anything about art; I had another convulsion of pleasure when Yale made me a Doctor of Literature, because I was not competent to doctor anybody's literature but my own, and couldn't even keep my own in a healthy condition without my wife's help."