Night Rainbow New Haven, by Yvette Mattern

"A light sculpture of monumental scale, Yvette Mattern’s Night Rainbow, Global Rainbow New Haven utilized high-specification lasers in each of the colors of the visual light spectrum (ROYGBIV) to create a rainbow emanating from the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument at the summit of East Rock Park, and over the City of New Haven. During the four-night projection from April 24 to April 27, 2013, New Haven residents were drawn from one neighborhood to the next, investigating the changes in the cityscape below, as well as in the form itself. The Rainbow was visible from many locations in and around the City, its form dynamic, changing shape depending on the viewer’s position to the origin point of the lasers."

The Clear Day. Richard First.

"The Richard Platt lot was on the southwest side of what is now Chapel Street, New Haven, facing the present grounds of Yale College and extending in the rear to land allotted to Rev. Peter Prudden. Richard is said to have built a house on this plot before his move to Milford, Conn., and, though he gradually disposed of his New Haven holdings after he relocated, he continued to own land in New Haven for a number of years."

The Thomas P. Merwin House, the William Bartlett House, and the Eighmie Patent Shirt

"Thomas P. Merwin, then one of the young dry goods merchants of the city, occupying the double store on Chapel street, adjoining the New Haven National bank, was married to Harriett A. Warner, daughter of Gaius F. Warner, the malleable iron manufacturer, by the Rev. William T. Eustis, pastor of that church, who was then one of the most popular preachers in the city. Four children have blessed that union, all of whom are living in this city to congratulate this couple upon fifty years of their happy married life. Mr. and Mrs. Merwin established their home on College street, enlarging the same from time to time as the growing family necessitated, where they still reside."

L’Occitane en Provence, at Warner Hall

"International retailer L’Occitane en Provence opened its newest boutique on Chapel Street just in time for the holiday shopping rush. The company signed a lease with Yale University Properties in early October and has spent the last several weeks refurbishing the building, which now features a wired glass and metal structure that is supposed to mimic a traditional greenhouse, according to a L’Occitane press release. Since its establishment in 1996 as a branch of the Office of New Haven and State Affairs, University Properties has sought to reinvigorate New Haven’s downtown shopping district by bringing in new restaurants and retailers to Broadway and Chapel streets."

Historical Renovation, by Kenneth Boroson Architects

"Located in the historic Sherman Building, built in 1860, this New Haven landmark required a substantial renovation to expand its facility. Second floor offices were converted into a dining area and a new commercial kitchen. The project also included the replacement of a historic grand mahogany staircase leading from the wood paneled main dining room to the new grand ballroom on the second floor. High level carpentry and finish work was required to integrate the redesigned staircase and new ballroom additions into the existing old world millwork."

ROGER SHERMAN TABLET.

"Upon the site of this building stood the home of Roger Sherman, and near here in 1793 he died, jurist - patriot - statesman, signer of the Bill of Rights, Articles of Confederation, Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States, first Mayor of New Haven, Treasurer of Yale College, and for twenty years a member of Congress -- Washington claimed his friendship and counsel, and was here his guest in 1789 -- to record his great service in the founding and early government of our country, this tablet is placed by the Connecticut society, Sons of the American Revolution, 1904."

A Mad World and its Inhabitants, by Julius Chambers

"On Chapel street, as the carriages approached, the chimes in Trinity tower were playing 'My Country, 'Tis of Thee.' The instant the notes caught the President's ear he again rose and reverently stood uncovered until the ivy-clad church was passed. It was a graceful and evidently an impulsive act — an incident thoroughly Rooseveltian."