This was Connecticut: images of a vanished world, by T. S. Bronson

"The great majority of photographs in this book are from the collection of the New Haven Colony Historical Society. But in order to give broader scope to this visual document of life in early Connecticut, other sources were used as well. These include the collection of Mrs. Edith LaFrancis (for all the striking photographs taken by George and Alvah Howes), the Sterling Memorial Library, Yale University (for selected scenes of life at early Yale)..."

The Development of the Green as a Public Square, by Henry Taylor Blake

"As the city grows more dense and thronged around it, its use as a convenient spot for public buildings can no longer be thought of, but its priceless value as a breathing and resting and gathering place for the people becomes constantly more conspicuous. May it be guarded from enroachment in the future more jealously than in the past; and may our successors in its care of every race and lineage protect its soil, and cherish its traditions with that affectionate veneration which is the heritage and the test of every true son and daughter of New Haven!"

These Old Houses of Connecticut

"The charm of these old houses lies in their intimate association with the history and growth of the colony, for they show a logical reason for their existence in that they were in accord with the needs and conditions of the times and answered the twofold purpose of clearing the forests and using the lumber to meet the demands of the settlers. Many of the old houses are gone and others are fast falling into decay, for the wooden buildings of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries lack the durability of modern construction."

The Thomas P. Merwin House, the William Bartlett House, and the Eighmie Patent Shirt

"Thomas P. Merwin, then one of the young dry goods merchants of the city, occupying the double store on Chapel street, adjoining the New Haven National bank, was married to Harriett A. Warner, daughter of Gaius F. Warner, the malleable iron manufacturer, by the Rev. William T. Eustis, pastor of that church, who was then one of the most popular preachers in the city. Four children have blessed that union, all of whom are living in this city to congratulate this couple upon fifty years of their happy married life. Mr. and Mrs. Merwin established their home on College street, enlarging the same from time to time as the growing family necessitated, where they still reside."

Historical Renovation, by Kenneth Boroson Architects

"Located in the historic Sherman Building, built in 1860, this New Haven landmark required a substantial renovation to expand its facility. Second floor offices were converted into a dining area and a new commercial kitchen. The project also included the replacement of a historic grand mahogany staircase leading from the wood paneled main dining room to the new grand ballroom on the second floor. High level carpentry and finish work was required to integrate the redesigned staircase and new ballroom additions into the existing old world millwork."

The Warner, Student Apartments, 1044 Chapel Street, New Haven, Conn.

"Although New Haven has about 100,000 inhabitants, a six-story building is quite a novelty here. The Chicago 'sky scrapers' are heard of the world over, and have aroused our conservative real estate proprietors, and several new structures in modern style are contemplated. Mr. H. Warner's new six-story building next to the Republican League is attracting much attention."

UNION LEAGUE CLUB. Corner Stone Laid with Fitting Ceremonies Yesterday.

"The corner stone of the addition which is being built by the Union league on Chapel street was laid with fitting exercises at 4:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon. Professor W. E. Chandler, treasurer of the club, presented the trowel in a few fitting remarks to President George B. Martin, who, after a few appropriate words, laid the stone."