This was Connecticut: images of a vanished world, by T. S. Bronson

"The great majority of photographs in this book are from the collection of the New Haven Colony Historical Society. But in order to give broader scope to this visual document of life in early Connecticut, other sources were used as well. These include the collection of Mrs. Edith LaFrancis (for all the striking photographs taken by George and Alvah Howes), the Sterling Memorial Library, Yale University (for selected scenes of life at early Yale)..."

Anna W. Dickinson is Married in Illinois to Richard B. Platt

"The bride was presented at the Passavant Cotillion in 1967. The bridegroom is a descendant of Richard Platt, who helped found the New Haven Colony in 1637."

The Gown Laid Aside

"New Haven was never a boom town. It developed slowly, it grew steadily, not spasmodically. Conservatism became characteristic of it. Conservative it has remained until now. All though the nineteenth century, while steadily growing in strength and substance, it never outwardly startled the beholder. Those who really knew the city came to love it for its 'parts' rather than for ostentatious prosperity. It was a city of traditions and history, a city content to have intensive rather than extensive growth was the New Haven which woke on the mourn of its 264th year when it celebrated with Yale the completed two centuries."

Joel Schiavone a gadfly without socks or sacred cows, by Bill Ryan

"Schiavone is thinking up new projects, in the atmosphere for meditation that he has created at his offices on Chapel Street in the old Union League building. The Union League, a private, exclusive men's club formed at the turn of the century, once would not have admitted anyone named Joel Schiavone. 'It was for WASPs.' He has taken the former hangout of the very privileged and created offices that bear the unmistakable stamp of Joel Schiavone."

Women of Yale, by Harriet H. Coffin

"For the first time in its long male history, Yale College last month graduated women — 182 in a class of 1,132. Called superwomen when first admitted two years ago as transfer students, they have frequently scored higher academically than their male classmates. But they don't feel like superwomen. The job market is even leaner for them than for their male classmates; and their two years at Yale have been rougher than expected."